1RWF

Discussion in 'Burma & India' started by Murdo Duncan, Oct 5, 2020.

  1. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Hi and my father briefly served with the 1RWF in the Arakan, Burma but I rad last night that on the 28th May 1944, the 1RWF that they ran into an ambush near Aradura losing "heavily". Does anyone have an idea how many loses were recored please?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 5, 2020
  2. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Hi and can anyone tell me where the 1RWF were based when they came out of the Arakan and just after their losses at Indin? My father says "in the middle of India" only. Perhaps it was where the Division was because he tells this short tale:
    At that barracks, still with the RWF of course, we were reinforced once more; a new CO and new Second-in-Command, new equipment. Apart from a lot of soccer there; I played for Scotland versus England (chuckles), Royal Scots versus RWF, and the Royal Scots had a grand left wing, Joyner[1] who had played for Raith Rovers; doesn’t sound much nowadays but he was a fine player. That new C.O. and his friend the second-in-command, they came from the same battalion, went through all the accounts and found that the Officers’ Mess was in deficit, called a meeting and explained that they could not understand the civilian type method of accounting that had been kept in the past and to make up the deficit, they recommended, they strongly recommended, i.e. they very well ordered that every officer forfeited one day’s pay."
    Could anyone confirm too in which unit Frank Joyner became captain adn perhaps the names of the new CO and Second in Command. My father left the RWF in August/September 1943 to reinforce 2 Suffolks again in the Arakan.


    [1] Frank Joyner (20 August 1918 – 25 April 1997) was a Scottish football player and manager.

    His first senior club was Raith Rovers, where Joyner was part of a team that set a league goalscoring record during the 1937–38 season. He was transferred to Sheffield United for £1650 in April 1938, but his career was then interrupted by the Second World War.

    Joyner initially signed up with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) and played as a guest for Third Lanark and Chelsea. He served in France behind German lines before returning to the UK and playing as a guest for Norwich City. Joyner then served in south Asia for two years, achieving the rank of captain.
     
  3. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    London Gazette.
    Emergency Commissions Indian Army.
    11th October 1942.
    To be Second Lieutenants:
    Sgt Francis McNab Joyner.
     
  4. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

  5. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

  6. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    Man, many wounded though.
    RWF Wounded.png
     
  7. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Many thanks and that note about him came from Wikipedia so perhaps he was eventually made an honorary captain as my father was made an honorary Major after 25 years in the Army Cadet Force after the war.
     
  8. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    He was almost certainly promoted later in his career. Unfortunately, the London Gazette tends to list only the initial commission date and the officer's name for Indian Army officers and rarely, his service number. There are exceptions if the officer received a gallantry award or a mention in dispatches.
     
  9. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Understood. Many thanks again!
     
  10. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    He was a member of the Burma Star Association.

    macnab.png
     
  11. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Impressive!!!!
     
  12. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Hi and wonder if you can just help me here please and one of the first downloads I did concerning my father (M.M. Duncan) a while ago....what si the significance of the second date? He was commissioned on the 10/02/1940 which was his parents wedding anniversary.... then the second date?
     

    Attached Files:

  13. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    According to the regimental history The Red Dragon, the Battalion was back in Ahmednagar by the middle of June 1943.
     
    Murdo Duncan likes this.
  14. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    Hi Dryan and many thanks and must try and look it up. My father said there were marvellous barracks!!!
     
  15. J Kubra

    J Kubra New Member

    Murdo,
    Perhaps a long shot, however, my late father (ex 2 RTR) served at the RAC Depot Poona (India) 21 May 42 – 29 Jul 43, which I believe is nearby Ahmednagar. I have had difficulty finding information about this unit. Do you have any reference to it or information please?
     
  16. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    Hello and welcome to the forum. It may be an idea to start a new thread regarding your father's service in the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment as it is likely to get lost in this one.

    Best wishes,

    Simon.
     
  17. High Wood

    High Wood Well-Known Member

    The second date, 10th October 1941, is the date of his promotion to War Substantive Lieutenant and marks his seniority within the officer hierarchy. In effect he would have to take orders from an officer of similar rank commissioned before him, but could give orders to an officer of similar rank commissioned after him should the situation arise.

    Murdo 001.JPG

    Murdo 002.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2020
  18. dryan67

    dryan67 Senior Member

    Shades of "Zulu"!
     
  19. Murdo Duncan

    Murdo Duncan Well-Known Member

    HI, and that is marvellous!! since their numbers are consecutive, do you think that means they were all al OCTU 166? I think he said he went off with four others to Cardiff. How do you think these things worked and why The Welch Regiment? He said he was quite happy there....
     
  20. Robert-w

    Robert-w Banned

    A common question I've seen regarding men's service in both World Wars is "why was he in x regiment when he came from yshire ?" I've seen one enquiring why his Cornish grandfather was in a Highland regiment. The simple explanation is that men were frequently allocated to where a gap needed filling often with little or no consideration as to their geographical background. The Welch needed a new officer and he was available.
     

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