59 Squadron honour roll update

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by aussie_59, Oct 19, 2008.

  1. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Blenheim IV R3635 lost ex Thorney Island 20 September 1940

    August 2002 photograph of P/O K V Palmer's crew interred at le Vast churchyard (Situated on the D26 minor road from St Vaast on the east coast of The Manche to Cherbourg.)

    Finally added onto site Thanks Harry
     
  2. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

  3. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    The only information on the death of Wg Cdr Geoffery Bartlett is to be found in the Daily Telegraph on 10 March by a family announcement. (attached)

    I would think that the DT and Lincolnshire Echo will follow it up eventually with a obituary.

    Thought you might like to know that I contacted the Funeral Service provider and they passed on my letter to the family of W/C Bartlett. His family were very pleased that I'd contacted them and I was sent some information for his memorial page. Thanks again Harry.
     
  4. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Just wanted to update this thread and say the there are now over 1000 personnel named on the 59 Sqn Honour Roll.

    New to the Roll amongst others are 26 WAAF personnel, 25 Corporals, 160 AC1 & 2 and 90 LAC personnel.

    Thanks,

    Lorenzo.
     
  5. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Hello all,

    Quite a while a go I got some great help with some crew losses and got some great details...

    I still had about a dozen names that I couldn't find anything on but recently have found some more info which has helped me to place them...

    Some of the names were of 59 Sqn aircrews reassigned to the Far East in late 1941, early 1942 (read more)

    But then yesterday, I found this... The ORB is hand written at this time, so I just missed it (many times)...


    LOST - 16/10/1941 - Failed to return from night patrol.

    Hudson Mk.III - TR-O

    P/O M.M. Sherley-Price
    Sgt HF Tomkins +
    Sgt White
    Sgt Page

    Only one casualty noted for this day. I'm assuming that the others were captured and became POW's, as there is no mention of them returning to the Squadron at a later date... Anyone have any more info?

    Thanks,

    Lorenzo.
     
  6. Peter Clare

    Peter Clare Very Senior Member

    Hello all,

    Quite a while a go I got some great help with some crew losses and got some great details...

    I still had about a dozen names that I couldn't find anything on but recently have found some more info which has helped me to place them...

    Some of the names were of 59 Sqn aircrews reassigned to the Far East in late 1941, early 1942 (read more)

    But then yesterday, I found this... The ORB is hand written at this time, so I just missed it (many times)...


    LOST - 16/10/1941 - Failed to return from night patrol.

    Hudson Mk.III - TR-O

    P/O M.M. Sherley-Price
    Sgt HF Tomkins +
    Sgt White
    Sgt Page

    Only one casualty noted for this day. I'm assuming that the others were captured and became POW's, as there is no mention of them returning to the Squadron at a later date... Anyone have any more info?

    Thanks,

    Lorenzo.

    According to the CWGC all the above were lost on 16 October 1941.

    Sherley-Price listed as 52 Squadron. CWGC - Casualty Details
    White listed as 52 Squadron. CWGC - Casualty Details
    Tomkins listed as 59 Squadron. CWGC - Casualty Details
    Page listed as 52 Squadron. CWGC - Casualty Details

    All commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.
     
  7. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Thanks Peter, much appreciated!

    Must be listed as incorrect on cwgc, just found that P/O Sherley-Price was posted to the squadron from No.6 OTU on 1/7/41 - First op' on the 8th with Sgt's White & Tomkins (Blenheim)... assuming that his crew came with him as there's no mention of them previous to the 8th...

    Thanks again, pity the rest of the crew didn't survive... I was hoping they had...

    Lorenzo.
     
  8. airmann1

    airmann1 New Member

    Just found this website.

    my father was a navigator for coastal command out of Bellykelly.

    His name is Ernest Fletcher
     
  9. Peter Clare

    Peter Clare Very Senior Member

    Hello and welcome to the forum.

    Do you know which squadron your father served with?

    Regards

    Peter
     
  10. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Hello, I'll have a look through the ORB's to see if I can find your fathers name. I haven't come across him so far, but that doesn't mean he's not there...
     
  11. aussie_59

    aussie_59 Senior Member

    Hello, only airmen Ive tracked down so far is an Australian, W/O R.H. Fletcher, NAV... could be a typo with initial if your father was Australian?
     
  12. bfcpete

    bfcpete New Member

    Hello folks, my name is Pete Moore and since the death of my mother last year I was left some information in her effects about her cousin, Sgt Jack Hine (Military Number 990454, RAF Volunteer Reserve), who was in 59 Squadron and is mentioned briefly in your roll of honour above. I am trying to put together a story-board and tribute for a musuem as I have some telegrams, photographs and the war medals left to his mother.

    As stated in your roll of honour above, Jack was in a Blenhiem Mark IV bomber (T2220) which was lost in action on 3 June 1941 attacking shipping off the Normandy coast. Jack was born in Blackpool, Lancashire in 1917 and was the wireless operator / gunner on the plane. The other members of the crew were Pilot Officer TD Kerr (from Southport in Lancashire) and Sgt KPT Fletcher who was the navigator / bombadier.

    I have also some research from French sources (who are trying to locate and identifty all aircraft lost in the Normandy area during WW2). Those sources confirm that P/O Kerr had been washed up on the coast and was buried at the Plurien cemetery with full military honours by the Germans on 12 July 1941. This was confirmed by a report from the 25th signal corps of the 709th German Infantry Division, which was based there at that time. The other two bodies and the wreckage of the plane were never located and recovered. A couple of years ago I visited the memorial at Runnymede to see Jack's inscritpion there.
    The raid in which Jack's plane was lost consisted of 2 Blenheims which took off from RAF Thorney island to attack shipping near St Malo and Cherbourg on the Normandy coast. The second plane apparently returned safely after Jack's plane was reported missing at 11.30 hours. The French sources suggest that the plane may have come down in the Bay of Saint Brieuc near St Malo.

    There was so much loss of life during WW2 and all of it was a tragedy. What is particularly moving in the effects that I have is the correspondence between Jack's mother and the RAF. Correspondence where she hoped that he was still alive and was a prisoner of war. She still hoped he would be found alive right up until the year after the war ended, even when he had been declared first missing and then presumed dead over 4 years earlier. It is for those reasons i want to do the tribute to him.

    Ironically,for the last 30 years I have lived in Lincolnshire, which was known as 'Bomber county' during WW2 and am just a few miles from RAF Scampton where 617 sqaudron (the Dambsuters) were based and which now houses the current RAF Red Arrows aerobatic team. Just a few weeks ago, a mile south of Lincoln, there was the official opening of the first pahse a permanent Bomber Command memorial. When completed it will include a spire the size of a Lancaster's wing span (already in place), a memorial wall (with all the names of bomber crews lost and which is partly in place), gardens and a vististor center / museuem (still to be completed). I am hoping that they or a musuem near to where Jack was brn may be intersted in my work when completed.

    Sorry for the long email. I hope you find the information above of some interest and use I would be interested in any information you may have on the deplyoments and missions of 59 squadron in the period from the outbreak of the war up until Jack's death in June 1941 and especially if thare was any connectionwith Lincolnshire during that period

    Regards
    Pete Moore
     
  13. bfcpete

    bfcpete New Member

    Forgot to add to my previous post above - I would appreciate any links to any photographs of 59 squadron in the period from the outbreak of the war to June 1941 when Jack hine was lost. I have a photo of him in uniform but not with any others of the aircrews.
    Thanks
    Pete
     
  14. Macca56

    Macca56 New Member

    The name "Rytherford" is incorrect it should be Rutheford.
     
  15. keith_lawrence

    keith_lawrence New Member

    Hi. I have recently obtained my late father’s WW2 record and have discovered that he was with 59 Squadron from 01 Aug 1941 to 27 Dec 1942 when he was transferred to 62 Squadron. His name was Clifford Reginald Lawrence (1919 – 1972). His service number was 907013 and he was a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner with a rank of Sgt in the RAFVR at the time of his posting to 59 Squadron. He was later awarded the DFC with his time in 59 Squadron being mentioned in the citation. It would be nice to see his name on your site. If you want copies of any relevant documents I’d be happy to email them.
    Regards
    Keith Lawrence
     
  16. alieneyes

    alieneyes Senior Member

    Sorry for the late reply. I was looking at something else.

    From Hugh Halliday's Honours and Awards database:

    ALLEN, F/O Ethan 2nd (J21435) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.224 Squadron - Award effective 25 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born at Biarritz, France, 4 June 1919. His father was president of a cellophane plastic company which may explain his many moves. Educated at Mr. Gibbs School (London, England), Pembroke House (Kenya), La Chataignerair (Switzerland), France and the United States (St.George’s School in Newport, Rhone Island and University of California). Although his home is recorded as being New York City, he had merely travelled there to join the RCAF; his previous occupation had been in California (selling rare books). Enlisted in Montreal, 4 December 1941 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.1 Training Command, 21 December 1941. To No.6 ITS, 14 March 1942; graduated and promoted LAC, 8 May 1942 but not posted until 7 June 1942 when posted to No.3 EFTS, London; to No.9 EFTS, St. Catharines, 21 June 1942; graduated 14 August 1942 and posted next day to No.16 SFTS; graduated and commissioned 4 December 1942. To No.1 GRS, 4 December 1942. To “Y” Depot, 13 March 1943. To RAF overseas, 26 March 1943. Disembarked in United Kingdom, 10 April 1943. To No.224 Squadron, 14 May 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 4 June 1943. Temporary Duty at Ballykelly, 18-28 October 1943. Killed in action 6/7 June 1944 (Liberator BZ942); name on Runnymede Memorial. Medal sent by registered mail to widow, October 1952. Photo PL-26997 (ex UK-737 dated 19 January 1944) shows him. PL-28008 (ex UK-7384 dated 19 January 1944) shows Flight Sergeant Morris Hayward (Vancouver) and F/O Ethan Allen (New York).

    Flying Officer Allen has completed many sorties and throughout has displayed great keenness and determination. One night as captain of aircraft he executed an attack on a large U-boat. Pressing home his attack with great determination, Flying Officer Allen straddled the vessel with a number of depth charges. On several other occasions this officer has participated in successful attacks on the enemy's underwater craft. By his skill, courage and coolness he has set a very fine example.

    His personal file has another citation provided for the University of California Honour Roll:

    This pilot by his skill, courage and coolness has set a very fine example in many sorties. On one occasion he pressed home his attack against a large U-boat with great determination and straddled the vessel with a number of depth charges. On several other attacks he has been successful against submarines.

    Training: Interviewed in Montreal, 1 December 1941. Noted that he had flown 16 hours dual (no solo), played all sports extensively. "Very good family, intelligent, cooperative, personality. Recommended."

    At No.6 ITS he was described as follows: "Excellent background; educated largely abroad; good appearance; likeable and very much in earnest; self possessed." Placed 18th in a class of 95.

    At No.9 EFTS he flew Tiger Moths (33 hours 25 minutes day dual, 34 hours 55 minutes day solo, one hour night dual). This included nine hours 45 minutes on instruments. Also logged 11 hours in Link. Flew eight hours dual before first solo. Placed 5th in a class of 32. "Very good background. Did a good job at this unit. Keen, responsive, intelligent. Stood 5th in course in G.I.S. Flying, good average. Instrument flying and Link, average." .

    Involved in flying accident, 7 August 1942, 0840 hours, Tiger Moth 3951 (seriously damaged). Ceiling unlimited, visibility 3-8 miles in haze, winds southeast, 5-15 m.p.h. He was solo and had 25 hours dual, 33 hours solo. Allen was uninjured; the other pilot (LAC James C. Cummings, Tiger Moth 8906, totally demolished) was slightly injured. Came down in a farmer’s field near Four Mile Creek Road.

    Collided in mid-air with another aircraft, striking it from above. Collision occurred at about 4,500 feet. Aircraft went partly out of control. Propellor was smashed and the ailerons did not respond to control. Brought aircraft in on forced landing and the craft turned over on its back.

    A report of the accident stated that the two Tiger Moths were flying too close to one another in contravention of Air Regulations. Blame was allocated to both pilots for failure to observe each other - “careless airmanship.” Note: There is a Flying Officer James C. Cummings killed in a flying accident, 9 November 1944 (Bolingbroke 10094, No.10 Bombing and Gunnery School) - not sure if this is the same man

    At No.16 SFTS he flew Anson aircraft (56 hours 25 minutes day dual, 69 hours 30 minutes day solo, two hours 25 minutes night dual, ten hours 30 minutes night solo). These figures included 14 hours 50 minutes in formation, 20 hours 40 minutes on instruments. Also logged 21 hours 30 minutes in Link. Navigation exercises involved six hours 55 minutes dual and 18 hours 35 minutes solo. Flew four hours 25 minutes dual before first solo. Described as "Above average in ground school. Excellent type. Gold worker and keenly interested. Commission material."

    Course at No.1 GRS was 28 December 1942 to 26 February 1943. Flew Anson aircraft (42 hours 35 minutes, all by day). Courses and marks as follows: D.R. Navigation Intermediate (97/100), D.R. Navigation Final (267/300), D.R. Navigation Airwork (246/300), Reconnaissance (171/200), Reconnaissance airwork (83/100), Compasses and Instruments (136/200), Meteorology (136/200), Signals (84/100), Coding (79/100), Ship Recognition (176/200), Photography (80/100), Visual Signals (Pass). Described by Course Instructor (F/L J.W. Hoodley ?) as follows: “A very intelligent, keen and conscientious pupil. His work both in the air and on the ground has been consistently above average. He is a very steady, dependable type, not inclined to lose control in a crisis.” To this the Chief Flying Instructor (W/C Reynell ?) added, “Keen, solid and reliable pupil. Should prove very useful in a G.R. Squadron.”

    Accident Overseas: At 1620 hours, 8 October 1943, St. Eval (No.224 Squadron, Liberator BZ790). Engaged on non-operational duty (compass swinging). At the time he reported 230 hours on Liberators and 420 on all types. His report stated:

    When throttles pulled right back aircraft seemed to have tendency to float and so stick was also pulled right back in attempt to check this. Landed on wrong three points - damaging tail skid. Ceiling 600 feet and visibility poor enough so that small circuit had to be made to keep runway in view. Wind was 12 m.p.h. and downwind to runway. Runway was changed (No.6 to No.2) immediately after landing - this floating of aircraft plausible.

    The Commanding Officer of No.224 Squadron (W/C A.E. Clouston) wrote:

    Under the circumstances, a young captain at the controls, and considering the low cloud height with hills behind the drome in cloud I consider the pilot did well in landing at St. Eval. The fact the tail skid touched is no fault of the captain but due to the lightly loaded Liberator and C.G. position.

    Particulars of death: Liberator BZ942 was airborne from St. Eval, 2139 hours, 6 June 1944 to conduct an anti-submarine patrol in the English Channel. No message was received and nothing more was heard of the aircraft. Crew were J21435 F/O E. Allen, DFC (pilot), J85506 P/O M.E. Hayward (second pilot), Aus 401371 F/L W.J. Eskler (RAAF, navigator), 53447 P/O H.E. Pugsley (navigator), 48957 F/O L.R. Aust, DFC, DFM (WOP/Air), 1104418 Warrant Officer H. McIllaney (WOP/Air), 1213956 Sergeant D.E. Froggatt (WOP/Air), 1596602 Sergeant A. McLaughlin (air gunner), 1826970 Sergeant J.B.C. Gray (air gunner) and 2207636 Sergeant A.H. Croft (flight engineer).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    J5295 F/Lt Ernest Ellwood Allen would not make an appearance on the CVWM as he survived the war, passing away in Welland, Ontario 5 May 2007. Again, from Hugh's database:

    ALLEN, F/L Ernest Ellwood (J5295) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.59 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO 2138/43 dated 22 October 1943. Born in St.George, Ontario, 6 May 1922. Enlisted in Hamilton, Ontario, 21 August 1940. To “R”, 31 August 1940. To No.1 ITS, 13 October 1940. Graduated and promoted LAC, 4 November 1940 when posted to No.4 EFTS; graduated 29 December 1940 when posted to No.8 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 16 May 1941; commissioned 17 May 1941. To “Y” Depot, date uncertain; to RAF overseas, 26 December 1941. Promoted Flying Officer, 17 May 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 17 May 1943. Invested with award at Buckingham Palace December 1943. To No.111 OTU, 2 January 1944. Repatriated 16 April 1945. To No.1 WS, 19 May 1945. To No.2 Air Command, 19 June 1945. To Release Centre, 17 August 1945; retired 20 August 1945. Died 5 May 2007 in Welland, Ontario. RCAF photo PL-3487 taken at No.8 SFTS, 1941 shows R70099 E.E. Neilson (Harrisburg ?), R71678 J.F. Boyd (Collingwood), 3640 C.S. Ratcliffe (Essex), R70090 J.S.R. Norton (Caledonia), R71699 J.A.D. Attwell (Toronto), R67719 A.R. Neilson (Windsor), R62604 C.P. Shriner (Lundy’s Lane, Niagara Falls) and R67680 F.R. Letson (Windsor). Photo PL-23284 is formal portrait; PL-26519 shows him with wife and her friend (Joyce Baines) after investiture.

    Flight Lieutenant Allen has proved himself to be a most determined and capable captain of aircraft. By his gallantry and fine fighting spirit he has contributed much to the morale of his squadron.
     
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  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Panel from Runnymede attached from my photo collection
    Flying Officer ALLEN, ETHAN
    Service Number J/21435

    Died 07/06/1944

    Aged 25

    224 Sqdn.
    Royal Canadian Air Force

    D F C

    Son of Horace Ransom Allen and Alice Gwynn Allen; husband of Martha Ester Allen, of Tujunga, California, U.S.A.
    Commemorated at RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL

    Location: Surrey, United Kingdom
    Number of casualties: 20285

    Cemetery/memorial reference: Panel 244.
    upload_2018-4-22_10-28-50.png
     
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