Battle of Britain

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by LuftwaffeFuehrer, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. redcoat

    redcoat Senior Member

    Sorry, meant the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk and its predecessor the P-36

    http://www.acepilots.com/planes/p40_warhawk.html
    Both the P-36 and P-40 were considered inferior by Fighter Command to the Spitfire and Hurricane already in front line service with the RAF
     
  2. morse1001

    morse1001 Very Senior Member

    Both the P-36 and P-40 were considered inferior by Fighter Command to the Spitfire and Hurricane already in front line service with the RAF

    Think of the lead time required for even something as simple as a P36 to be readied for squadron service and the fact that Hurricanes and Spitfire were built in the country.

    But I am sure, the RAF picked up some P40 from a diverted French Order.
     
  3. LuftwaffeFuehrer

    LuftwaffeFuehrer Junior Member

    May I? Again as one that was around during those momentous times, I do know a bit about it, many of my mates were pilots. I was in Southampton during the Blitz, and on the South coast during the Battles. The Radar staion was close by.

    First: Those young men were the cream of the nation, there was no way that they would be forced to fly at the point of a gun. reading that made me smile, for it showed what a total lack of knowledge the writer has.

    The enemy pilots at that time were experienced and battle hardened young men. Not only that, they were on the crest of a winning wave. They thought that no one could resist them.

    The battles went on day after day, without a let up. Where the enemy failed was at the last moment... when the RAF was at the point of complete exhaustion they turned to night time raids.

    You would have to have understood the mood of the Country at that time. For instance: even at the most dangerous of times, you would be hard pressed to find a single soul that thought we could be beaten.

    Even if we had lost the battle of Britain, there was the Navy, and in those days it was a very big Navy!

    I have to say here, that many of you fail completely to understand the fighting quality of the British Service man in any service.

    You also fail completely to understand the mood of the nation. or of its tough and dour fighting quality. But there! How could you understand? You would have to be there. That is just as well, for if you were? you would be an old Buzzard like me! I am sure you could do without that!

    The one great loss to the UK was that at the end of the war, our losses of 6 years of war "around the globe" took a terrible toll post war, for those aggresive, and thrusting young men the Nation needed to push the Country forward were not there.

    It took a generation to replace them.
    Never cry them down, they were the Gladiaters of the modern age.

    "Dont cry for me, Johnny head in air"

    For I still recall looking down the valley watching, and listening, to the Spitfire doing Victory rolls, and the music of the Merlin engine, like a beautiful symphony, a heavenly sound composed for an English Summer day!

    Rest In Peace young men
    Sapper

    Are you serious you were there during that battle :icon-mrgreenbandit:
    sweet lol

    see even he says it, the RAF was at the point of collapse because of
    exhausting

    in this topic some people have been discussion whether the invasion of
    England would have been succesful with air superiority

    in my opinion, even with the Luftwaffe having air superiority i doubt
    the Kriegsmarine along with the Heer, would have able to succesfully
    invade England

    One thing, the Royal Navy was too strong and the Kriegsmarine too weak
    and the Luftwaffe wasn't going to be able to stop the Royal Navy from
    intercepting the invasion fleet, althought the Royal Navy would have
    had a high rate of casualties

    another thing that a lot of people don't know, is that the English
    had set up an awesome defensive barrier on its borders near France

    and last but not least, the Kriegsmarine and the Heer was able to
    actually work together because of the rivalry that they had, so they
    didnt' agree on a specific strategy
     
  4. Desert Dog

    Desert Dog Member

    Inferior or not. Sucess is measured by air supriority and if there were not enough Spitfires and Huricanes around I'm sure they would be better than nothings. Fortunately the war of attrition ended before that became the case.

    Besides the P-40 was pretty sucessful against the 'superior' Zero.
     
  5. Glider

    Glider Senior Member

    The P40 available in Sept 1940 was the original P40. It was only armed with 2 x .50 ( with provision for 2 x LMG not always fitted). It lacked armour for the pilot, bullet proof screen and self sealing fuel tanks.

    Against the 109E, they would have been a death trap.
     
  6. redcoat

    redcoat Senior Member

    Inferior or not. Sucess is measured by air supriority and if there were not enough Spitfires and Huricanes around I'm sure they would be better than nothings.
    Indeed.
    However in the battle there was never a shortage of fighters for Fighter Command.
    The British were building around 500 Hurricanes and Spitfires a month, compared to the Germans who were only managing to build just over 200 Bf 109s a month.
     

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