Glider Pilot Regiment - Distinguished Flying Medals

Discussion in 'Airborne' started by Drew5233, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9048

    This NCO has taken part in three airborne operations and on each occassion has displayed skill and courage in getting his glider down safely and his load into action.

    3rd October, 1944.


    LG 15.2.45
     
  2. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Immediate

    Air2/9074

    Navigator

    Since joining this Squadron in July, 1944, Flight Sergeant Seddon has successfully completed five airborne operational sorties. Though he was on one occasion shot down at Arnhem on the third day, Flight Sergeant Seddon has always shown the utmost keenness to fly on operations and his navigational skill has been of a high order. He showed the utmost coolness and determination when under enemy fire during the recent operation over the Rhine.

    30th March, 1945


    LG 8.6.45

    Remarks by Station Commander:

    An NCO whose courage has earned him recognition. Strongly Recommended.
     
  3. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9077

    This NCO of 'F' Squadron, No.2 Wing, Glider Pilot Regiment, flew glider tactical No.769. When approaching the landing zone, his machine was hit by anti-aircraft fire and the control surfaces damaged. The pressure bottles in the cockpit burst and Sergeant Wilce, the second pilot, was seriously injured. Brakes and flaps were rendered useless. Despite this, however, Staff Sergeant Strenes landed his glider in the correct area, saving the lives of his passengers but causing serious injuries to himself. The action took place at Arnhem on 18th September, 1944.

    28th October, 1944


    LG 11.4.46
     
  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9102

    On 24th March, 1945, Staff Sergeant Taylor was the first pilot of a glider taking part in the airborne assault across the Rhine, North of Wesel. After a flight lasting three hours, the area was seen to be obscured by smoke and considerable enemy anti-aircraft fire was encountered. Staff Sergeant Taylor pressed on to the allotted area and made a successful landing without damage to his glider or the load carried. This NCO has been first pilot of a glider on Operations 'Husky', 'Neptune' and 'Market' and on all occasions has shown outstanding skill in the air and complete mastery over adverse conditions.

    4th June, 1945


    LG 16.8.45
     
  5. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9048

    The Horsa glider which Staff Sergeant Twiggs was piloting was badly damaged by flak whilst flying over Holland. In spite of this, he managed to control his aircraft and, under the most difficult and hazardous conditions, flew on and successfully landed his load at the landing zone. By his determination and skill, he set a fine example to all pilots and inspired great confidence in his passengers.

    3rd October, 1944.

    LG 15.2.45
     
  6. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9640

    Staff Sergeant Wallwork was one of the glider pilots selected for the coup-de-main assault on the Benouville DRS on 6th June, 1944. It was known that the approaches to the DRS were obstructed against airborne landings and defended in strength. Staff Sergeant Wallwork volunteered for this duty and cheerfully agreed to land his glider on the best place tactically, irrespective of the obstructions to flying. He carried out his task with great accuracy. Throughout the journey, through his cheerfulness and confidence, he was a great encouragement to his passengers. By his skill and courage , the successful accomplishment of a difficult and hazardous task was made possible. I strongly recommend Staff Sergeant Wallwork for the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

    7th June, 1944


    LG 19.10.44
     
  7. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9077

    During a flight on Operation 'Market II' on 18th September, 1944, total aileron control of the Horsa Glider which Staff Sergeant Watkinson was piloting completely failed on approaching the Dutch coast but, in spite of enemy flak and the fact that the glider was swinging violently from side to side, this glider pilot and the tug aircraft pilot, through superhuman effort, managed to control the combination for a distance of 40 miles towards the landing zone until finally, throughthe great strain, the rope parted. Then, with calm judgement and great skill, Staff Sergeant Watkinson managed to force-land the glider without causing injury to his passengers. It was entirely through the skill, courage and cool determination of this pilot that he overcame the hazardous conditions and avoided a fatal crash, at the same time being successful in landing his load intact within reach of our own troops.

    28th June, 1944


    LG 11.4.46
     
  8. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/8983

    This Staff Sergeant Pilot reached his target area successfully - He landed through flak and searchlights and through his calm and cool leadership, the anti-tank gun and jeep were successfully put into action. The very fact that he was able to land in the landing zone was a great feat of flying courage. He had been on tow for five hours over the sea and in darkness.

    28th July, 1943


    LG 11.11.43
     
  9. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Despatcher

    Lance Corporal Whittaker was the NCO commanding RASC despatching crew engaged in the resupply of airborne troops at Arnhem, Holland, on 19th September, 1944, (Operation MBAO/2). On approaching the DZ, Driver Davis, a member of the crew, was badly wounded through both thighs and bleed profusely. Lance Corporal Whittaker had to decide very quickly to leave Davis and despatch the panniers. He also had to rally his crew who were badly shaken. This he did with such success that the drill was carried through without a hitch and all the panniers were despatched in one run-in. The aircraft subsequently crashed in Belgium and Driver Davis died. Lance Corporal Whittaker and the remainder of his crew returned to this Company after several days. Lance Corporal Whittaker was suffering from shock and he had developed a bad stammer, he immediately volunteered to go on another operational sortie but was not allowed to do so. Lance Corporal Whittaker was given the chance to bailing out but decided to stay in the plane to look after Driver Davis.

    25th October, 1944
    LG 31.5.45

    Letter from Flying Officer L.P. Pattee, No.48 Squadron.

    Sir,

    I have the honour to make the following statement on the commendable action of Lance Corporal Whittaker, W. of your Company.

    On 19th September, 1944, he was leading despatcher in my Dakota aircraft KG.401. The first time over the DZ, we were not in the correct position to drop. While over the DZ, we were under enemy fire and received light strafing and saw other aircraft shot down around us, but this in no way disturbed our despatchers. The second run over the DZ was under more intensive enemy fire but our supplies were despatched with remarkable speed.

    While turning away, the aircraft received a crippling blow and it was at this time that the despatcher, Driver Davis, was mortally wounded. Lance Corporal Whittaker informed us of Davis's condition and the Wireless Operator and Lance Corporal Whittaker rendered him first aid. Lance Corporal Whittaker then remained with Davis, keeping the tourniquet tight while we underwent several more poundings from enemy fire.

    Having examined the extent of the damage and danger of explosion from the fire, as soon as we reached Allied territory, I gave the crew the opportunity to jump. This was not taken, however, and they decided to remain with the aircraft. In the few seconds that remained, Lance Corporal Whittaker helped prepare Driver Davis for the crash landing.

    I was very pleased with the leadership of Lance Corporal Whittaker in the speed with which our supplies were despatched and with his coolness and presence of mind throughout the ordeal.



    Letter from Flying Officer F.J. McIntyre, No.48 Squadron.

    Sir,

    I have the honour as Wireless Operator of Dakota aircraft KG.401 to comment on the fine example displayed by Lance Corporal Whittaker of your Comapny.

    Whilst he was a member of our crew on 19th September, 1944, I watched him in action. Although we were subjected to intense enemy fire, Lance Corporal Whittaker remained very calm and conducted the despatching to the letter. Although they were momentarily hindered by a bar falling on the conveyor, it was one of the best despatchings I have seen.

    After Lance Corporal Whittaker and I had rendered first aid to Driver Davis, Lance Corporal Whittaker remained with him to keep the tourniquet in place and make him comfortable. Although we were hit several times again, he stayed with him. It was only when given the opportunity to jump by the pilot that Lance Corporal Whittaker left Driver Davis but, on second thoughts, he decided on the contrary and in the brief seconds that remained, we assumed crash positions.

    The conduct of Lance Corporal Whittaker while under fire was exceedingly good. He displayed the utmost coolness and initiative.
     
  10. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Air2/9102

    On 24th March, 1945, Staff Sergeant Wright was the first pilot of a Hanoa power glider in the airborne assault across the Rhine, North of Wesel. After a flight of three hours, his glider was hit by enemy anti-aircraft fire. A piece of anti-aircraft shell pierced the pressure system, thus rendering flaps and wheel brakes unserviceable. Knowing the importance of his load, Staff Sergeant Wright was determined to land in the correct area. In spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and a thick smoke screen, Staff Sergeant Wright reached his allotted area and landed the glider with its load intact. By the fact of having his flaps and brakes unserviceable, there is no doubt that Staff Sergeant Wright's exceptional skill was mainly instrumental in the safe landing under the most difficult circumstances. Staff Sergeant Wright also took part in Operations 'Neptune' and 'Market', displaying great skill in the air on both occassions.

    4th June, 1944 (Typo? Possibly 1945)


    LG 16.8.45
     
  11. bart belonje

    bart belonje Junior Member

    S/Sgt Watkinson and Sgt Jones, force landed, Horsa RJ221 cn-878, near the village of Fijnaart. Jones died of his wounds in the home of mrs Born van Dis. Others made POW

    They did not reach friendly troops, as was stated.
     
  12. blitz_researcher

    blitz_researcher Junior Member

    Air2/9077



    LG 11.4.46

    Thanks for posting this information, it was very helpful. You may be interested to know this man featured in "Forgotten Voices of the Blitz and the Battle of Britain" by Joshua Levine. His photo is on page 362 and the sad story of the death of his wife from injuries in an air-raid is on pages 360-1 (page references are to the hardback copy).
     
  13. Stormboy

    Stormboy Junior Member

    For Normandy

    Air2/9638



    LG 12.10.44

    Thanks for your post on Sgt S.G.Bone DFM. I am his grandson & was thrilled to read this about my "Pop".
    I look forward to chatting with members of this forum in times to come,
    All the best,
    G :)
    :D:D:D
     
  14. GPRegt

    GPRegt Senior Member

    Thanks for your post on Sgt S.G.Bone DFM. I am his grandson & was thrilled to read this about my "Pop".
    I look forward to chatting with members of this forum in times to come,
    All the best,
    G :)
    :D:D:D

    Welcome to the Forum!

    If you haven't, already, please pop along to the GPR's Facebook page - link below. You also may be interested in joining the GPR Association - please see the 'Association' page on the GPR website (link below).

    Steve W.
     
  15. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Hi Stormboy and welcome,

    Your "Pop" figures prominently in a thread on a photo taken by Sgt. David A. Reynolds of the CFPU found here:

    Identify that RAF Pilot D-Day

    If you do a search for "Bone" I'm sure you will find other mentions as well. If you have any photos or other information you wish to add please do so as we would love to see them.

    Regards ... :)
     
  16. jeffbubble

    jeffbubble Senior Member

    here is Lenny in his role as Sports master in Whitehaven.
     

    Attached Files:

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