Jeeps

Discussion in 'Weapons, Technology & Equipment' started by Dave55, Apr 20, 2017.

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  1. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    I've seen pictures of the gunner sitting on the spare. It was just the right height for that. Just seems odd to go to the trouble of either drilling holes for the bracket or welding it on. Seems they would have better things to do. Love the picture though

    EDIT: Maybe it isn't a spare. Maybe a wheel for some type of equipment lashed to left side of jeep?
     
  2. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    I think the holes were already there. I've seen photos of other jeeps with the spare there

    WW2 jeep spare wheel placement
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
  3. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Interesting. Didn't know about the pre-drilled holes
     
  4. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

  5. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    Most Jeeps it appears have the spare wheel at the rear of the vehicle. As it was possible to flatten to front screen (as was also a choice on Mk1 Land Rovers, but spares on bonnets was not an option initially) it would seem rather daft to lower the screen onto the spare wheel - it just wouldnt work. The fitting of a spare wheel onto the bonnet would have been a 'local' modification, as with the SAS in North Africa for example where they need to carry 'extras' didnt need the screen (as they normally wore goggles).
    The fitting of a spare onto the bonnet may have been a later modification for example to Jeeps used in NW Europe and/or a change to non foldable screens (i.e could not flatten them onto the bonnet)

    Try contacting Jeep

    TD

    Nothing predrilled for a spare on this one Eddie Guffee’s Jeep – WW2 Jeeps

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    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
  6. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Back in the 60s I and a number of student friends shared a Mk I Land rover. It had the ability to fit a spare wheel mounting on the bonnet. The windscreen could be completely dismounted rather than fold forward (the doors could also be taken off as we did in the summer) The Austin Champ had a similar provision
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
  7. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Any more info on those? First of heard of non folding ones. Seems they would be harder to manufacture to me.
     
  8. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Don'tre member

    I thought it was when they modified them from split screens to single screens - in much the same way as Land Rover did - but done rely on that

    TD
     
  9. AB64

    AB64 Senior Member

    In British Airborne use the moving of the wheel to in front of the radiator was,I believe, to reduce the height of the jeep so that it could be fitted in a Horsa glider (steering wheels were made removable for the same reason) - in the SAS they seem to have used armour on the radiator which affected cooling and I think the wheels couldn't be places there as it made it even worse - on the bonnet seems to be a compromise. I don't think jeeps came with holes for alternative placement of the spare but in a unit workshop I don't imagine it was a particularly difficult job.
     
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  10. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Fairly sure there were no single pane screens until after the war. The first civilian ones in 1946 were still two pane and folding. Spare mount was on the side for those as they had a tailgate. Pops had one. :)

    Here's Dad in his 1946 looking at my uncle John's carbine. He was just back from Korea. Metal top was after market.
    upload_2020-1-17_13-42-26.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2020
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  11. JimHerriot

    JimHerriot Ready for Anything

    Some from books, others are personal, variance on a spare positioning theme (and armament too).

    From Popski to Pistol to Postwar, from Brens to Brownings (.50 variety, or Ma Deuce for Dave55!) to Ks.

    I've tried to post them in some sort of chronological order, any out of kilter I apologise for in advance.

    And most importantly, posted with all due reverence and respect to those pictured who are no longer with us.

    Kind regards, always,

    Jim.
     

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  12. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Thanks for the work on that post.

    I notice that many have the right headlight either removed or blanked over. Anyone know why this was done?
     
  13. JimHerriot

    JimHerriot Ready for Anything

    Hello Dave 55. I think (but will happily stand corrected) that the blanked out headlight stemmed from UK blackout regulations in association with military convoy procedures.

    Headlights were never used in action (seldom might be better than never there maybe).

    Hopefully the vehicle specialist folks will be along in a minute to put me right.

    Kind regards, always,

    Jim.
     
  14. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

  15. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    I like the picture but haven't a clue what is going on. It's the first civilian version, a CJ-2A. The headlights are not recessed and can't be turned backwards into the engine bay like the military ones.

    upload_2020-4-3_18-11-20.png
     
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  16. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Doesn't say much for the Jeep does it? Obviously had to be recovered from a ford using a horse! Given that the mechanic has a pair of waders it would suggest that this was not an uncommon occurrence at that ford.
     
  17. JimHerriot

    JimHerriot Ready for Anything

    Doesn't say much for the chap's horsemanship does it?

    Heading for his favourite fishing spot (hence waders) on his trusty steed, Dobin, who for no apparent reason (he's never done it before!) becomes rooted to the spot midstream. Fortunately within half an hour in the chilling icy waters help arrives in the shape of young miss, out for a drive in her jeep. By now near hypothermic chap just manages with frozen fingers to catch the rope the lady throws out to him. Having secured to Dobin with his last strength he propels line back to young miss who proceeds to pull Dobin plus frozen chap from the water. Once on the bank she secures the Mark Spitz of the equine world, said Dobin, to her trusty jeep's front bumper. Fisher-chap is then sensibly directed to warm his icy hands over the engine, having realised that any attempt to restore their circulation by placing them on the female good Samaritan would be met by a punch up the throat and a knee in the nethers (she being more concerned with removing the mud spot splashed on her shirt when retrieving roped Dobin and rider).

    Every picture tells a story, but how folks interpret said picture is oft different.

    Dave55, cracking picture, don't give up on the Jeeps yet!

    Kind regards, always,

    Jim.
     
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  18. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    By Arthur Sarnoff, apparently.
    Given that he's the dogs playing pool bloke, I haven't delved into the rhyme or reason behind his illustrations...
     
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  19. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    A number were illustrations for short stories in mags such as the Sat Evening Post and he seems to have done a few boy meets girl themes for these. I think his dog pictures made money - simple as that - whimsy sells
     
  20. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    Ended up in the hands of an some SS slob with a PPSH

    upload_2020-4-7_17-49-24.png
     

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