Lorry Number

Discussion in 'Vehicle Names and Census Numbers' started by hutt, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. hutt

    hutt Member

    Hi
    Is there any possibility of providing information on the lorry from the number that appears on its bonet in the attached photograph? It may have a Royal Engineers connection and have possibly been taken in Italy. I interpret the number as 4146783
    Thanks in advance
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    The only information is directly related to the issue of the WD serial (census) number L4146783 (my reading also)

    L4146751 - L4146950 - Contract V3603 - Bedford 3 Ton 4x2 GS (General Service)

    It apparently related to a batch of Bedford OYs commencing chassis number OY 21001

    ...So not a vehicle that would be associated with any particular type of unit. I'd have expected a 1940 build based on the number (but don't have that specific information). This would make it perhaps a little old for the Italian campaign and the camouflaged Nissen hut in the background gives the photo more of a UK feel. Are you able to share the rest of the photo ?
     
  3. hutt

    hutt Member

    OK, I guess it was a long shot to expect the details that may have tied it to a unit but anyway, thank you for what you have provided. Attached is the full picture and yes, I agree, Nissen huts are not likely to be associated with Italy so that places this earlier in the war and likely in the UK which is still useful as part of a broad timeline.
    In due course I'll post a couple of other vehicle photos as any information to confirm possible times and locations will always be useful as part of broader research.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. RCG

    RCG Senior Member

    Ignoring the lorry.
    The Cpl sticking his fingers up, seems clean and is wearing muddy wellies.
    The one sitting on the roof brandishing stillsons (pipe wrench) why is he doing that?
    Two on the left, tunics undone, one with really muddy boots. suggests they have been grafting.
    Chap next to the Sgt a bit like Wesley from last of the summer wine, filthy overalls tattered at the bottom.
    The chap near the wheel also has grimy jacket and jumper. but appears to be a civilian, he does look a bit Italian. POW?
    So we have a group of ten men celebrating an achievement, possible with the stillsons.
    Throw in the lorry and RE connection, was this a UXB squad, who had just tackled difficult bomb?
     
  5. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    The sergeant in the photo with the MT gloves doesn't appear to have a Royal Engineers cap badge. The oval shape with the crown distinctly above rather than part of a wreath makes it look more like REME which would fit quite well with the oily overalls.

    The stony ground and nissen hut backdrop might suggest a Scottish posting.
     
  6. hutt

    hutt Member

    That's a great couple of replies, thank you. It is almost certainly something RE related (glamorous as UXB work would sound) as one of the men is an uncle. As has been said they certainly look like they've been working so knowing what my uncle was involved in while in Italy, I am going to plump for this possibly being related to building an airfield and which from what I do know of his movements could be UK or perhaps Scotland or Iceland although I just feel the sun is too high for a location near the arctic circle.

    As for the men, I agree the badge is not immediately obvious as RE and but is a reasonable match to REME but I am not sure when they were formed and if they would necessarily have repaired RE equipment. I presume he is a dispatch rider but does he have too many stripes?

    As for the gent in civvies, yes a non UK national is a possibility, would Italian POWs have assisted with constructing airfields in the UK?

    I hope the wrench went no further!!
     
  7. Rich Payne

    Rich Payne Rivet Counter Patron 1940 Obsessive

    The gloves are not necessarily motorcycle. Officially they were 'M.T.' (Motor Transport) driver's gloves - most trucks still had open cabs in 1940. The leather jerkin was also a fairly typical driver's cold-weather issue as it was less cumbersome in a small cab than a greatcoat. REME took over all major vehicle maintenance so their Light Aid Detachments could have been anywhere.

    I wondered about Iceland too - that scree surface is fairly typical and there were certainly nissen huts. A Iceland Polar Bear.jpg
     
  8. RCG

    RCG Senior Member

    I know they worked on farms, and it seems that they did also work on defense sites
    and built this magnificent chapel in their spare time.
    Italian Chapel - Wikipedia
     

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