Pictures of Wildlife in your Back Garden

Discussion in 'The Barracks' started by Drew5233, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. Robert-w

    Robert-w Banned

    The European Starling goes through several changes of plumage before getting their full adult plumage and the early sub adult plumage has more fluffy down in it which does make them look larger
     
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  2. Wobbler

    Wobbler Well-Known Member

    Cheers Robert, I didn’t know that.
     
  3. canuck

    canuck Closed Account

  4. tmac

    tmac Senior Member Patron

    Can anyone identify this moth/butterfly, which flew in from the garden this morning?
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Robert-w

    Robert-w Banned

    Leopard Moth. The caterpillars start to putate at the beginning of May. Yours is one of the early ones. The adults have no feeding parts and only live long enough to mate and lay eggs. You could say they go out with a bang.
     
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  6. tmac

    tmac Senior Member Patron

    Thanks for that - I thought the colouring looked leopard-like. Sounds like they have a short but interesting life.
     
  7. brithm

    brithm Senior Member

    Attached Files:

  8. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    I have worked in the Twickenham area for over 30 years and these birds are common place and very successful breeders. At my last job there were three very tall Lebanon Cedars in the car park and a colony of these loud buggers would sit in the high branches all day. Larger birds such as crows and jackdaws never seems to bother the parakeets as they would get severely bullied by the colony if they did.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
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  9. Robert-w

    Robert-w Banned

    I have seen a few round here in the Marches, however given that the Goshawks are coming back I wouldn't give too much for their chances
     
  10. HAARA

    HAARA Well-Known Member

    We have a nightly visitor who comes for any leftovers we may have after our evening meal. I've been trying to get a good portrait of him for a few days - a remotely controlled camera just scared the life out of him, so managed last night to get this pic through an open doorway. He was a bit camera shy. Shot just using a security light, and 200mm lens on 16000ISO.Was tempted to go higher but grain would have been a problem. fox3.jpg
     
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  11. canuck

    canuck Closed Account

    Great photo. In the winter here, when food is scarce, you can coax the foxes to feed from your hand. Starvation always trumps shyness.
     
  12. tmac

    tmac Senior Member Patron

    Screen Shot 2020-06-05 at 14.35.28.png

    Can anyone identify this lovely plant that's sprung up in our garden border? We've lost the marker for it.
     
  13. Tolbooth

    Tolbooth Patron Patron

    Campanula persicifolia or peach-leaved bellflower - related to the old Canterbury Bells.
     
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  14. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Old Hickory Recon

    I keep seeing what I think is a yellow cardinal in my back yard. I've tried to get a photo or two of it, but it does not sit still long enough in a location that I can get a good shot of it with my...telephone camera.

    I've put binoculars and a good 35mm digital camera with a telephoto lens in my screen porch, so maybe I can get lucky.
     
    canuck likes this.
  15. tmac

    tmac Senior Member Patron

    Thanks, tollbooth - that's saved hours of scrolling through books and websites.
     
  16. KevinC

    KevinC Slightly wierd

    16000 !!!!!
    Is your camera on steroids
     
  17. S C

    S C Member

    In all seriousness, this is my back yard (screenshots from video, sorry about the quality) P1010046.JPG .

    bear_1.jpg bear_2.jpg
     
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  18. S C

    S C Member

  19. canuck

    canuck Closed Account

  20. HAARA

    HAARA Well-Known Member

    Following up on my post on Monday I wanted to photograph more of the foxes that visit our garden so that I can develop a recognition data base of each individual, probably four in all. So, last night I put out some dog biscuits adjacent to a security light in the hopes that foxes would turn up and dwell by the food to allow me to take photos. Two duly turned up, but much to my surprise so did a hedgehog making straight for the biscuits, forcing the foxes off the food! One fox returned, and after an initial spike on the nose from the quills, decided to join in the meal. No social distancing here! The hedgehog seemed relatively unconcerned to have such a large predator next to it, and between them finished the lot. Interestingly, after all the food had gone, a second hedgehog joined the first for a bit of foraging.
    foxandhedgehog.jpg
     
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