SS Sebastiano Venier (Jason) 09 Dec 1941

Discussion in 'Prisoners of War' started by docproducer, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Hopkins

    Hopkins Junior Member

    Yes that is correct.

    If you can get a chance to watch the movie "Home by Christmas" It is all about Ed Prestons exploits, taken from interviews with Ed by his Daughter (who incidentally wrote, produced and directed the movie, and Eds grand daughter played Eds Wife)

    As an option you can watch the DVD with the actual recorded interview. He recalled much detail about the Jason.

    It is an excellent movie, well worth the watch.

    Home By Christmas
     
  2. daysleeper

    daysleeper Junior Member

    Hi Brian, My uncle was aboard the jason and im trying to get info if he was killed before it was torpedoed as i know he was injured prior to capture.His name was Albert Taylor from London and he was a rifleman with the 2nd battallion.Any help would be appreciated /lists etc Many thanks Barry
     
  3. shantara

    shantara Junior Member

    Hi,

    I have only just joined the WW2TALK site and am doing some research into my grandfather's service in the war. I know very little about it as he talked about it very rarely to any family.

    I stumbled across this post and hope that you might be able to point me in the direction to find out more information.

    My grandfather was Harold Alton Hardy from Dundee in South Africa. He served as a signaler with HQ Platoon, No.1 Brigade Signal Co. 5th S.A. Infantry. Captured 23.11.1941, Tobruk and a British POW in Italian hands.

    He escaped from an Italian sinking boat and was re-captured (assuming the Sebastiano Venier looking at dates). Transferred to Stalag 344 and Stalag VIIIA and completed the 'death march'.

    I would dearly like to get a better picture of what he went through, as would my mother and would really appreciate any information that you feel may be of help.

    Regards,

    Michael
     
  4. Son of POW-Escaper

    Son of POW-Escaper Senior Member

    Hi,

    I have only just joined the WW2TALK site and am doing some research into my grandfather's service in the war. I know very little about it as he talked about it very rarely to any family.

    I stumbled across this post and hope that you might be able to point me in the direction to find out more information.

    My grandfather was Harold Alton Hardy from Dundee in South Africa. He served as a signaler with HQ Platoon, No.1 Brigade Signal Co. 5th S.A. Infantry. Captured 23.11.1941, Tobruk and a British POW in Italian hands.

    He escaped from an Italian sinking boat and was re-captured (assuming the Sebastiano Venier looking at dates). Transferred to Stalag 344 and Stalag VIIIA and completed the 'death march'.

    I would dearly like to get a better picture of what he went through, as would my mother and would really appreciate any information that you feel may be of help.

    Regards,

    Michael


    Michael,

    It doesn't have many specifics about Stalag VIIIA or 344, however I can recommend 'The Last Escape' by John Nichol and Tony Rennell as a good book about the Death March.

    Best of luck,

    Marc
     
  5. shantara

    shantara Junior Member

    Thanks Marc,

    I'll certainly look it up.

    Michael
     
  6. wendyburns

    wendyburns Junior Member

    Hi ,my father was on board this ship and I have it written in a diary that he kept(have his whole diary that was buried) he fought with a fellow on board to save him from diving overboard as the propellers were still going and he would have been killed.He told me this story and one day at church in Durban North South Africa that same man introduced himself to my father and cried and thanked him for saving his life.He then introduced his wife and family to us.
     
  7. wendyburns

    wendyburns Junior Member

    Has anyone got any info regarding Harold Hardy Signaller H.Q.Platoon No.1 Brigade Signal Co. 5th S.A.Infantry service no: 3402 captured 23.11.1941 Tobruk
    POW in Italian hands
    Escaped from sinking Italian boat-recaptured
    POW Camp C.C. No 65 PM 3450 on 20.3.1942
    POW German hands
    Trfd from Stalag VIII/A to Stalag VIII/B on 4.11.1943
    Tfrd to Stalag 344 28.12.1943
    POW No:81208 / in german hands
     
  8. ClaireGoosen

    ClaireGoosen Junior Member

    Hello everybody. Long story etc, but my interest in Sebastiano Vernier stems from family history research. It turns out that my mom's first husband was on board the ship. He was RC Wright of the 1 SA Irish. All I have is an article from the "Home Front" The MOTH Magazine dated July 1988. Before I carry on, am I allowed to quote the article or extracts on this site?
    Claire
     
  9. GELGreenland

    GELGreenland Junior Member

    Hi Brian,

    With reference to the Sebastiano Venier, I was most interested to read of the list of casualties you have and was wondering whether you could help me to resolve some conflicting information which I have with regard to family history.

    A member of my family, South African born Desmond T Sturgeon, fought in North Africa and died on 9 December 1941, aged 19, service number 78701. He is remembered at Alamein according to the CWGC website and the names of his parents are correct, Lawrence and Swea Sturgeon. I know absolutely nothing about where he may have seen active service in N.Africa. He was a member of the 3rd battalion of the Transvaal Scottish regiment which saw active service, and sustained huge casualties, at Sidi Rezegh but whether he was here or at another location, I do not know.

    The information conflicting with this is that I was recently told BOTH father and son, i.e., Desmond and Lawrence, were on board a vessel in South African waters when they were torpedoed. Lawrence, on an upper deck, survived, while Desmond on a lower deck, died. Now, I had not known that the father had gone to war but had always known of Desmond's war record. I realise Desmond could not have died in South African waters AND been buried in Alamein war cemetery so based on the recently acquired information and Desmond's date of death, my investigations took me to the torpedoing of the Sebastiano by HMS Porpoise on 9 Dec 1941. However, would any of those who died on the Sebastiano have been buried at Alamein? And if the father survived, did he become a POW?

    I wondered whether any of the information you hold could confirm whether Desmond and his father were ever on board the Sebastiano Veniero.

    Many thanks.

    GEL
     
  10. KiwiProud

    KiwiProud Junior Member

    My Great Uncle Richard Trevor Casey was on board from the research I have done to date and like many I would be interested to hear from anyone who has his name mentioned war records/diaries. I have one page of information he left his niece. Trevor was also captured in Crete but escaped and re-joined his unit.

    Here is a link to a NZETC book written about the Petrol Division in which Trevor is mentioned.

    CHAPTER 9 — Libya, 1941 | NZETC

    Movements since being captured near Tobruk on 26th November 1941
    Marched and rode through Derna to Benghazi reaching Benghazi 30th November.
    Embarked on modern Freighter (approx.9000 tons) 8th December.
    Torpedoed (?) near coast of Greece on 9th December.
    Disembarked from wreck on 12th December.
    Marched to Pilos (12 kms) 12th December 1941
    By truck to Kalamata 14th December.
    By train to camp near Patras (Dysentery Acre) 14th December.
    By truck (18km) to sheds in Patras 30th December 1941.
    To convalescent hospital (Dysentery?) 10th January 1942
    Back to sheds on water front 19th January.
    Attempted break 8th February. Taken to cells in city.
    Taken to Greek hospital in Patras 18th February 1942.
    Left Patras on hospital ship 2nd March.
    Disembarked Bari, Italy 4th March, taken to military hospital in city.
    Taken to Transit camp (75) on outskirts of Bari 11th March.
    By train to Gravina camp (65) 23rd April 1942.
    By train to Tuturano camp (85)
    Left Tuturano 1st August by train to vicinity of Macerata, arrived Labour Camp at Mentelupone, 2nd August (Camp 129)
    Left Mentelupone travelling by truck, train and electric train to Monturano camp (70) 3rd September 1942.
    Left Monturano (70) for Labour camp No.1.P G 78 (aquafredda) 30th April 1943.
    Italy capitulates! 8th September 1943.
    Leave camp 12th September 1943 Going----???
    Left Lettomanpello 22nd October 1943.
    Reached Pretoria 23rd October.
    Pennapiedimonte 24th October.
    Frastaninatin(?) 25th October – just north of Bomba 26th October “The Great Circle”
    Just south of Bomba, 27th October moved 500yds.
    28th October near Wilma.
    29th October near Front.
    30th October reached 8th Indian Division at Montefalcalrone.
    Driver Trevor Richard Casey Petrol Division No.6635
    The torpedoed ship was The Jantzen, The book by Spence Edge & Jim Henderson “No Honour, No Glory” The ship was the Jason.
     
  11. mcct

    mcct Junior Member

    Hi Emanuel...my father was on the Jason..I have some photos of it after it was torpedoed...it was a dreadful experience for the men on board...Spence Edges book(a friend of my father's) titled "No Honour No Glory"...gives a good account...there has been some "updates" made to that book recently....many men were buried in shallow graves which the sea has eroded and I understand they are trying to do something about this...there is also a local historian that lives in the village where the men came a shore...they are trying to find the exact location of Dysentry Acre that the men spoke of...best wishes with your DOC
     
  12. louisejames

    louisejames Junior Member

    Hi MCCT,
    Have been trying to source a copy of Spence's book but have had no luck. When you say it's been updated do you mean it's been reprinted at all?
    Hope you can help.
     
  13. mcct

    mcct Junior Member

    Hi Louise James...I have seen some updated data..but I dont believe another edition etc has been printed...have you tried second hand bookshops via the web ,in New Zealand?
    Regards
    MCCT
     
  14. Ravrick

    Ravrick Senior Member

    Hi, what an interesting thread, I am research a Pte JJF savory 1st essex who is listed as died on 9th Dec 1941 and commorated on the Alamein memorial. Is anybody able to check if he died when the ship went down?

    Cheers,
    Rick
     
  15. Ravrick

    Ravrick Senior Member

    Hi, there is a possibility he died on the POW ship as he is listed in the "UK Army roll of honour 1939-45" as place of death "at sea":

    Name: James J F Savory
    Given Initials: J J F
    Rank: Corporal
    Death Date: 9 Dec 1941
    Number: 6011582
    Birth Place: Middlesex
    Residence: Middlesex
    Regiment at Enlistment: Essex Regiment
    Branch at Enlistment: Infantry
    Theatre of War: At sea
    Regiment at Death: Essex Regiment
    Branch at Death: Infantry

    Cheers,
    Rick
     
  16. Harry Ree

    Harry Ree Very Senior Member

    There is an article on the loss of the Sebastiano Venier in the Greek magazine Mani from 2012,relating to an unidentified British soldier buried at Romanos.(Andy Bye posted his research on the subject on this thread and has his article published in Mani)

    Entitled the Unknown Soldier of Romanos,it accounts for a soldier's body washed ashore in December 1941 after the Italian POW ship had been sunk by HMS submarine Porpoise.

    http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1wux6/InsidetheMani2012par/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=http://www.insidemani.gr/digital-edition/
     
  17. Lindsay Fergusson

    Lindsay Fergusson New Member

    Hi newbie on this listing.
    I've just received my late father's POW records via ICRC.
    I believe he was on this POW ship.. survived and went to various Camps in Italy and Germany.
    Does the list of persons LOST also advise NZers saved?
     
  18. HA96

    HA96 Member

    Hi, Emanuel and grias di from Biberach/Riss
    I am eager to see your productions in future. please keep us informed.
    Stefan.
     
  19. Mr Jinks

    Mr Jinks Bit of a Cad

    Stefan,

    You may have to try a PM to Emanuel ? They haven't posted since January 2009 (nine years ago :( )

    Kyle
     
  20. Mr Jinks

    Mr Jinks Bit of a Cad

    Welcome Lindsay,
    Hopefully you will receive the answers you need but Brian, whose post you quoted, and really the No1 expert on this subject sadly passed away a couple of years ago. Greatly missed and someone who helped me a lot :(

    Kyle
     

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