Was China Any Significance?

Discussion in 'War Against Japan' started by Hidden_Sniper, May 12, 2005.

  1. Hidden_Sniper

    Hidden_Sniper Junior Member

    Did the Chinese provide any significance in the war against the empire of Japan?
     
  2. Friedrich H

    Friedrich H Senior Member

    China did little harm to the Japanese military might, not even after equipped and trained by the US. However, the Japanese were forced to fight a long attrition war in China, a guerrilla warfare that sucked in many Japanese resources and caused many attrocities. The main two issues here must be that China kept many Japanese divisions there and not fighting at Kohima or Guadalcanal, and that almost 20 million Chinese people were killed by the Japanese invasion.
     
  3. Hidden_Sniper

    Hidden_Sniper Junior Member

    I was told that both sides of the Chinese Civil War joined together to face-off and block out against the Japanese. And had they not joined together, would it be an easy takeover for Japan?
     
  4. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by Hidden_Sniper@May 12 2005, 05:57 PM
    I was told that both sides of the Chinese Civil War joined together to face-off and block out against the Japanese. And had they not joined together, would it be an easy takeover for Japan?
    [post=34414]Quoted post[/post]
    The Chinese did put aside their Civil War when facing the Japanese invasion, but only after considerable outside pressure. One factor was that the Soviets recognized that the Kuomintang had the upper hand, so they sent supplies, planes, and airmen to Chiang Kai-Shek, to the anger of Mao Ze-Dong, who remembered that insult once he was in power. However, Chiang continued to stockpile troops and supplies for the day of reckoning against his Communist rivals, and launched anti-Communist offensives anyway. Various American bigshots tried to broker a truce, including former Secretary of War Patrick J. Hurley, but little ground was made. American, British, and Soviet aid kept Chiang Kai-Shek in power and in the war. If that had not existing, I think China would have continued to fragment under Japanese pressure (they set up puppet governments, like Manchukuo and suborned key warlords), and the Japanese might have taken Chungking.
     
  5. Hidden_Sniper

    Hidden_Sniper Junior Member

    So basically, the Chinese were a weak country either way; and had not the allies helped them with supplies, they would have crumpled to the hands of the Japs.

    Also to your point, Soviet Union supported the other guy, not Mao? So he was just going to jump on either winning sides line?
     
  6. Kiwiwriter

    Kiwiwriter Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by Hidden_Sniper@May 16 2005, 07:36 PM
    So basically, the Chinese were a weak country either way; and had not the allies helped them with supplies, they would have crumpled to the hands of the Japs.

    Also to your point, Soviet Union supported the other guy, not Mao? So he was just going to jump on either winning sides line?
    [post=34521]Quoted post[/post]
    China should have been a strong country, given its natural resources and vast manpower reserves. But the bickering, corrupt, self-serving warlords, the civil war, the fascistic KMT regime, made China weak. Stilwell's diaries are filled with his venomous hatred of the KMT bigshots he served. One of his more caustic comments came when some visiting American polticians were to be taken to see the battlefront. "That's the biggest market in China," Stilwell retorted. "That's where the Chinese and Japanese are busy selling things to each other." An American journalist also noted how he was taken to see vast piles of booty purportedly captured by Chinese troops in battle with the Japanese. He was convinced the same pile was being moved from battlefield to battlefield to impress the American reporters. So he scratched his initials on a Japanese helmet, and sure enough, it re-appeared each time. As for Stalin supporting Chiang, this should not surprise anyone. Stalin was a cautious and realistic dictator, who dealt in realpolitik. He recognized that while the Communist Chinese were doing most of the fighting, and had a good relationship with the average Chinese peasant, they were not yet strong enough to overthrow the KMT. Only the KMT could stop the Japanese. If the Japanese were not stopped, they would be strong enough to invade Siberia, and take it over, as they had from 1919 to 1922. So he played the shrewd game of supporting anti-Communists.
     
  7. angie999

    angie999 Very Senior Member

    Originally posted by Hidden_Sniper@May 16 2005, 11:36 PM
    Also to your point, Soviet Union supported the other guy, not Mao? So he was just going to jump on either winning sides line?
    [post=34521]Quoted post[/post]

    One thing to always remember about Stalin's Soviet Union is that their key issue was never the spread of communism throughout the world, it was the defence of the Soviet Union.

    Their actions regarding China reflected the fact that in WWII the KMT government were doing a better job of keeping the Japanese in check than the Chinese communists were.

    Particularly after the despatch of Red Army divisions from Siberia to Europe, it was important for the Soviet leadership that the Japanese threat be at least neutralised.
     
  8. zstar

    zstar Junior Member

    Originally posted by Kiwiwriter+May 16 2005, 01:56 PM-->(Kiwiwriter @ May 16 2005, 01:56 PM)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteBegin-Hidden_Sniper@May 12 2005, 05:57 PM
    I was told that both sides of the Chinese Civil War joined together to face-off and block out against the Japanese. And had they not joined together, would it be an easy takeover for Japan?
    [post=34414]Quoted post[/post]
    The Chinese did put aside their Civil War when facing the Japanese invasion, but only after considerable outside pressure. One factor was that the Soviets recognized that the Kuomintang had the upper hand, so they sent supplies, planes, and airmen to Chiang Kai-Shek, to the anger of Mao Ze-Dong, who remembered that insult once he was in power. However, Chiang continued to stockpile troops and supplies for the day of reckoning against his Communist rivals, and launched anti-Communist offensives anyway. Various American bigshots tried to broker a truce, including former Secretary of War Patrick J. Hurley, but little ground was made. American, British, and Soviet aid kept Chiang Kai-Shek in power and in the war. If that had not existing, I think China would have continued to fragment under Japanese pressure (they set up puppet governments, like Manchukuo and suborned key warlords), and the Japanese might have taken Chungking.
    [post=34501]Quoted post[/post]
    [/b]
    Wrong the civil war was put aside when the Xi'an incident happened.

    And they already setup numerous puppet govts for instance Wang Jingwei's Nanjing puppet nationalist govt.

    And don't forget China was fighting Japan for 5 years before America joined the war so the only help they had in the beginning was ironically Nazi Germany.
     
  9. Ignacio

    Ignacio Junior Member

    Yes, but the war in china was not only against guerrillas, it was against divisiones, corps and armies that the chinese gobernment organized and equipped. There were a lot of really big battles
     
  10. davidbond

    davidbond Junior Member

    There're more than 35000000 Chinese killed by Japan-invader.
    War in China against japan diverted more than half japanese army, despite the surrending of WangJingWei-government, all Chinese got ready to make sacrifices-------help from Soviet Union and US was also very important------after all we won the war!
    [​IMG]
     
  11. spidge

    spidge RAAF RESEARCHER

    Welcome to the forum David.
     

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