World War I centenary: Paving stones to honour heroes

Discussion in 'Prewar' started by dbf, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Charles Garforth, Victoria Cross,Lechmere Road,Willesden

    Garforth was 22 years old, and a corporal in the 15th (The King's) Hussars, British Army during the First World War when the following deeds took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    On 23 August 1914 at Harmingnies, France, Corporal Garforth volunteered to cut wire under fire, which enabled his squadron to escape. On 2 September when under constant fire, he extricated a sergeant who was lying under his dead horse, and carried him to safety. The next day, when another sergeant had lost his horse in a similar way, Corporal Garforth drew off the enemy fire and enabled the sergeant to get away.[1]

    He was taken prisoner in October 1914 and was repatriated in November 1918. He later achieved the rank of sergeant. His Victoria Cross and other medals are displayed at the Imperial War Museum, London.
    Charles Ernest Garforth - Wikipedia

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  2. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Humphrey Firman,Victoria Cross,South Kensington Station forecourt London

    Firman was born in 1886 to H. B. Firman, J.P., of New Malden, Surrey.[1] When he was 29 years old, and a lieutenant in the Royal Navy during the First World War, he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his deeds on the night of 24 April 1916 in Mesopotamia in an attempt to resupply the forces trapped in the Siege of Kut. He was killed in action.

    Humphrey Osbaldston Brooke Firman - Wikipedia

    LieutenantFIRMAN, HUMPHREY OSBALDSTON BROOKE
    Died 24/04/1916

    Aged 29

    S.S. "Julnar."
    Royal Navy

    V C, Mentioned in Despatches

    Son of Mr. H. B. Firman, J.P., of Gateforth Lodge, Coombe Hill, New Malden, Surrey.

    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette", dated 2nd Feb., 1917, records the following

    "The General Officer Commanding, Indian Expeditionary Force "

    D", reported on this attempt in the following words:- " At 8 p.m. on April 24th, 1916, with a crew from the Royal Navy under Lieut. Firman, R.N., assisted by Lieut. Comdr. Cowley, R.N.V.R., the " Julnar ", carrying 270 tons of supplies, left Falahiyah in an attempt to reach Kut. Her departure was covered by all artillery and machine gun fire that could be brought to bear, in the hope of distracting the enemy's attention. She was, however, discovered and shelled on her passage up the river. At 1 a.m. on the 25th, Gen. Townshend reported that she had not arrived, and that at midnight a burst of heavy firing had been heard at Magasis, some 9 miles from Kut by river, which had suddenly ceased. There could be but little doubt that the entrprise had failed, and the next day the Air Service reported the " Julnar " in the hands of the Turks at Magasis. The leaders of this brave attempt, Lieut. H.O.B. Firman, R.N., and his assistant, Lieut. Comdr. C.H. Cowley, R.N.V.R. - the latter of whom throughout the campaign in Mesopotamia performed magnificient service in command of the "Mejidieh", - have been reported by the Turks to have been killed; the remainder of the gallant crew, including five wounded, are prisoners of war. Knowing well the chances against them, all the gallant officers and men who manned the 'Julnar' for the occasion were volunteers. I trust that the services in this connection of Lieut. H.O.B. Firman, R.N., and Lieut. Comdr. C.H. Cowley, R.N.V.R., his assistant, both of whom were unfortunately killed, may be recognised by the posthumous grant of some suitable honour." The account of the award is preceded by the following paragraph:- "The King has been graciously pleased to approve of the posthumous grant of the Victoria Cross to the undermentioned officers in recognition of their conspicuous gallantry in an attempt to re-provision the force besieged in Kut-el-Amara."

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  3. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Richard Bell Davies,Victora Cross,Sloane Square,London

    The KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the grant of the Victoria Cross to Squadron-Commander Richard Bell Davies, D.S.O., R.N., and of the Distinguished Service Cross to Flight Sub-Lieutenant Gilbert Formby Smylie, R.N., in recognition of their behaviour in the following circumstances:—

    On the 19th November these two officers carried out an air attack on Ferrijik Junction. Flight Sub-Lieutenant Smylie's machine was received by very heavy fire and brought down. The pilot planed down over the station, releasing all his bombs except one, which failed to drop, simultaneously at the station from a very low altitude. Thence he continued his descent into the marsh. On alighting he saw the one unexploded bomb, and set fire to his machine, knowing that the bomb would ensure its destruction. He then proceeded towards Turkish territory. At this moment he perceived Squadron-Commander Davies descending, and fearing that he would come down near the burning machine and thus risk destruction from the bomb, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Smylie ran back and from a short distance exploded the bomb by means of a pistol bullet. Squadron-Commander Davies descended at a safe distance from the burning machine, took up Sub-Lieutenant Smylie, in spite of the near approach of a party of the enemy, and returned to the aerodrome, a feat of airmanship that can seldom have been equalled for skill and gallantry.[3]


    Richard Bell Davies - Wikipedia

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  4. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Job Drain,Victoria Cross,Broadway Theatre,Barking London

    Victoria Cross[edit]
    On 26 August 1914 at Le Cateau, France, when a captain (Douglas Reynolds) of the same battery was trying to recapture two guns, Driver Drain and another driver (Frederick Luke) volunteered to help and gave great assistance in the eventual saving of one of the guns. At the time they were under heavy artillery and infantry fire from the enemy who were only 100 yards (91 m) away.[1]

    He later achieved the rank of Sergeant. He died on 26 July 1975.
    Job Henry Charles Drain - Wikipedia


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  5. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Frank Stubbs , Victoria Cross,Pasley Park,Kennington,London

    On the 25th April, 1915, headquarters and three companies of the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by very deadly fire from hidden machine guns, which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained. Amongst the many very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Captain Bromley, Serjeant Stubbs, and Corporal Grimshaw have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most signal acts of bravery and devotion to duty.

    Serjeant STUBBS, FRANK EDWARD
    Service Number 1506

    Died 25/04/1915

    Aged 27

    1st Bn.
    Lancashire Fusiliers

    V C

    Native of Walworth, London.


    Frank Edward Stubbs - Wikipedia
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  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Clifford Coffin,Victoria Cross,Lewisham War Memorial south London.

    On 31 July 1917 in Westhoek, Belgium, when his command was held up in attack owing to heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, Brigadier-General Coffin went forward and made an inspection of his front posts. Although under the heaviest fire from both machine-guns and rifles and in full view of the enemy, he showed an utter disregard of personal danger, walking quietly from shell-hole to shell-hole, giving advice and cheering his men by his presence. His gallant conduct had the greatest effect on all ranks and it was largely owing to his personal courage and example that the shell-hole line was held.[1]

    Clifford Coffin - Wikipedia


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  7. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Francis Harvey,Victoria Cross, Lewisham War Memorial south London.

    At Jutland, Harvey, although mortally wounded by German shellfire, ordered the magazine of Q turret on the battlecruiser Lion to be flooded. This action prevented the tons of cordite stored there from catastrophically detonating in an explosion that would have destroyed the vessel and all aboard her. Although he succumbed to his injuries seconds later, his dying act may have saved over a thousand lives and prompted Winston Churchill to later comment: "In the long, rough, glorious history of the Royal Marines there is no name and no deed which in its character and consequences ranks above this".[1]
    Francis Harvey - Wikipedia

    Major HARVEY, FRANCIS JOHN WILLIAM
    Died 31/05/1916

    Aged 43

    H.M.S. "Lion."
    Royal Marine Light Infantry

    V C

    Native of Sydenham, Surrey.
    Casualty
    Commemorated at CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

    Location: Kent, United Kingdom
    Number of casualties: 18655

    Cemetery/memorial reference: 18.
    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette," No. 29751, dated 15th Sept., 1916, records the following

    "Whilst mortally wounded and almost the only survivor after the explosion of an enemy shell in "

    Q" gunhouse, with great presence of mind and devotion to duty ordered the magazine to be flooded, thereby saving the ship. He died shortly afterwards."



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  8. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    John Lynn,Victoria Cross, Lewisham War Memorial south London.

    On 2 May 1915 near Ypres, Belgium, when the Germans were advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas, Private Lynn, although almost overcome by the deadly fumes, handled his machine-gun with great effect against the enemy, and when he could not see them, he moved his gun higher up the parapet so that he could fire more effectively. This eventually checked any further advance and the outstanding courage displayed by this soldier had a great effect upon his comrades in the very trying circumstances. Private Lynn died the next day from the effects of gas poisoning.[1]
    John Lynn - Wikipedia

    Private LYNN, JOHN
    Service Number 1272

    Died 02/05/1915

    Aged 27

    2nd Bn.
    Lancashire Fusiliers

    V C, D C M

    Cross of the Order of St. George, 4th Class (Russia). Foster son of Mrs. E. Harrison, of 20, Hindsley Place, Forest Hill, London.
    Casualty
    Buried at GROOTEBEEK BRITISH CEMETERY

    Location: West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
    Number of casualties: 109

    Cemetery/memorial reference: Vlamertinghe Churchyard Memorial
    CITATION

    An extract from the "London Gazette," dated 29th June, 1915, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery near Ypres on 2nd May 1915. When the Germans were advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas, Pte. Lynn, although almost overcome by the deadly fumes, handled his machine gun with very great effect against the enemy, and when he could not see them he moved his gun higher up on the parapet, which enabled him to bring even more effective fire to bear, and eventually checked any further advance. The great courage displayed by this soldier had a fine effect on his comrades in the very trying circumstances. He died from the effects of gas poisoning."


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  9. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Richard Jones,Victoria Cross, Lewisham War Memorial south London.

    For most conspicuous bravery. He was holding with his platoon a crater recently captured from the enemy. About 7.30 P.M. the enemy exploded a mine forty yards to his right, and at the same time put a heavy barrage of fire on our trenches, thus isolating the Platoon. They then attacked in overwhelming numbers. Lt. Jones kept his men together, steadying them by his fine example, and shot no less than fifteen of the enemy as they advanced, counting them aloud as he did so to cheer his men. When his ammunition was expended he took a bomb, but was shot through the head while getting up to throw it. His splendid courage had so encouraged his men that when they had no more ammunition or bombs they threw stones and ammunition boxes at the enemy till only nine of the platoon were left. Finally they were compelled to retire.
    Richard Basil Brandram Jones - Wikipedia

    Lieutenant JONES, RICHARD BASIL BRANDRAM
    Died 21/05/1916

    Aged 19

    8th Bn.
    The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

    V C

    Son of Henry Thomas Brandram Jones and Caroline Emma Jones, of 2, Thicket Rd., Anerley, London.
    Casualty
    Commemorated at ARRAS MEMORIAL

    Location: Pas de Calais, France
    Number of casualties: 34845

    Cemetery/memorial reference: Bay 7.
    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette" dated 5th August, 1916, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery. He was holding with his platoon a crater recently captured from the enemy. About 7.30 P.M. the enemy exploded a mine forty yards to his right, and at the same time put a heavy barrage of fire on our trenches, thus isolating the Platoon. They then attacked in overwhelming numbers. Lt. Jones kept his men together, steadying them by his fine example, and shot no less than fifteen of the enemy as they advanced, counting them aloud as he did so to cheer his men. When his ammunition was expended he took a bomb, but was shot through the head while getting up to throw it. His splendid courage had so encouraged his men that when they had no more ammunition or bombs they threw stones and ammunition boxes at the enemy till only nine of the platoon were left. Finally they were compelled to retire."




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  10. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Walter Stone,Victoria Cross, Lewisham War Memorial south London.

    For most conspicuous bravery when in command of a company in an isolated position 1,000 yards in front of the main line, and overlooking the enemy's position. He observed the enemy massing for an attack, and afforded invaluable information to battalion headquarters. He was ordered to withdraw his company, leaving a rearguard to cover the withdrawal. The attack developing with unexpected speed, Capt. Stone sent three platoons back and remained with the rearguard himself. He stood on the parapet with the telephone under a tremendous bombardment, observing the enemy and continued to send back valuable information until the wire was cut by his orders. The rearguard was eventually surrounded and cut to pieces, and Capt. Stone was seen fighting to the last till he was shot through the head. The extraordinary coolness of this heroic officer and the accuracy of his information enabled dispositions to be made just in time to save the line and avert disaster.
    Walter Napleton Stone - Wikipedia

    Captain STONE, WALTER NAPLETON
    Died 30/11/1917

    Aged 25

    3rd Bn. attd. 17th Bn.
    Royal Fusiliers

    V C

    Son of Edward and Emily Frances Stone, of Blackheath, London. Educated at Harrow and Pembroke College, Cambridge.
    Casualty
    Commemorated at CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL

    Location: Nord, France
    Number of casualties: 7069

    Cemetery/memorial reference: Panel 3 and 4.

    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 12th Feb., 1918, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery when in command of a company in an isolated position 1,000 yards in front of the main line, and overlooking the enemy's position. He observed the enemy massing for an attack, and afforded invaluable information to battalion headquarters. He was ordered to withdraw his company, leaving a rearguard to cover the withdrawal. The attack developing with unexpected speed, Capt. Stone sent three platoons back and remained with the rearguard himself. He stood on the parapet with the telephone under a tremendous bombardment, observing the enemy and continued to send back valuable information until the wire was cut by his orders. The rearguard was eventually surrounded and cut to pieces, and Capt. Stone was seen fighting to the last till he was shot through the head. The extraordinary coolness of this heroic officer and the accuracy of his information enabled dispositions to be made just in time to save the line and avert disaster."


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  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Eric Robinson,Victoria Cross,Diamond Terrace,Greenwich,London

    Rear Admiral Eric Gascoigne Robinson VC, OBE (16 May 1882 – 20 August 1965) was a Royal Navy officer and an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He earned his award by going ashore and single-handedly destroying a Turkish naval gun battery while a lieutenant commander with the fleet stationed off the Dardanelles during the Gallipoli campaign in the First World War
    Eric Gascoigne Robinson - Wikipedia


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  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Henry Kenny,Victoria Cross,Maryon Park,Charlton,London


    On 25 September 1915 near Loos, France, Private Kenny went out on six different occasions under very heavy shell, rifle and machine-gun fire. Each time he carried into a place of safety a wounded man who had been lying in the open. He was himself wounded as he handed the last wounded soldier over the parapet.[3]
    Henry Edward Kenny - Wikipedia

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  13. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    A couple of photos that I took at Streatham Common in July 2016 in respect of Lt Geoffrey Cather of the Royal Irish Fusiliers.

    Faugh a Ballagh

    IMG_2341 (2).JPG


    Lieutenant CATHER, GEOFFREY ST. GEORGE SHILLINGTON
    Died 02/07/1916

    Aged 25

    Adjt. 9th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers

    V C

    Son of the late Mr. R. G. Cather and of Mrs. M. M. Cather, of Limpsfield, Surrey.
     

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  14. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    A couple more from July 2016: this time from Glasnevin.

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    Captain BELL, ERIC NORMAN FRANKLAND
    Died 01/07/1916

    Aged 20

    9th Bn. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers attd. 109th Light T.M. Bty.

    V C

    Son of Capt. E. H. Bell, of 22, University Rd., Bootle, Liverpool. Native of Enniskillen, Ireland.
     

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  15. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

    IMG_2570 (2).JPG

    Rifleman MCFADZEAN, WILLIAM FREDERICK
    Service Number 18278

    Died 01/07/1916

    Aged 20

    "C" Coy. 14th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles

    V C

    Son of William and Annie Pedlow McFadzean, of Rubicon, Cregagh, Belfast.
     

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  16. bexley84

    bexley84 Well-Known Member

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  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Cecil Kinross,Victoria Cross,Harefield War Memorial,Middlesex

    For the most conspicuous bravery in action during prolonged and severe operations.

    Shortly after the attack (on Passchendaele Ridge) was launched, the company to which he belonged came under intense artillery fire, and further advance was held up by a very severe fire from an enemy machine gun. Private Kinross, making a careful survey of the situation, deliberately divested himself of all his equipment save his rifle and bandolier and, regardless of his personal safety, advanced alone over the open ground in broad daylight, charged the enemy machine gun, killing the crew of six, and seized and destroyed the gun. His superb example and courage instilled the greatest confidence in his company, and enabled a further advance of 300 yards to be made and a highly important position to be established.[1]


    Cecil John Kinross - Wikipedia

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  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Robert Ryder,Victoria Cross,Harefield War Memorial,Middlesex.

    On 26 September 1916 at Thiepval, France, Private Ryder's company was held up by heavy rifle fire and all his officers had become casualties. For want of leadership the attack was flagging when Private Ryder, realising the situation and without a moment's thought for his own safety dashed, absolutely alone, at the enemy trench and by skilful handling of his Lewis gun succeeded in clearing the trench. This very gallant act inspired his comrades, made the subsequent advance possible and turned what could have been failure into success.[1]
    Robert Edward Ryder - Wikipedia
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    Headstone from St Marys,Harefield.

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