World War I centenary: Paving stones to honour heroes

Discussion in 'Prewar' started by dbf, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    John Pattison,Victoria Cross,General Gordon Square,Woolwich,London

    On 10 April 1917 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge, in the area of Hill 145 (the location of today's Memorial), when the advance of Canadian troops was held up by an enemy machine-gun that was inflicting severe casualties, Private Pattison, with utter disregard of his own safety, sprang forward and jumping from shell-hole to shell-hole, reached cover within thirty yards of the enemy gun. From this point, in the face of heavy fire he hurled bombs killing and wounding some of the crew, and then rushed forward overcoming and bayoneting the surviving five gunners. His initiative and valour undoubtedly saved the situation.[2]

    He was killed in action at Lens, France, on 3 June 1917. He is buried at La Chaudière Military Cemetery, France located 7 miles north of Arras (plot IV, row C, grave 14).[3]
    John George Pattison - Wikipedia

    Private PATTISON, JOHN GEORGE
    Service Number 808887

    Died 03/06/1917

    Aged 42

    50th Bn.
    Canadian Infantry

    V C

    Son of Harry and Mary Pattison; husband of Mrs. S. L. Pattison, of Suite 12, Curtis Block, Calgary, Alberta. Native of New Cross, England.


    INSCRIPTION
    LEST WE FORGET" MOTHER, WIFE AND FAMILY
    Buried at LA CHAUDIERE MILITARY CEMETERY, VIMY

    Location: Pas de Calais, France
    Number of casualties: 594

    Cemetery/memorial reference: VI. C. 14.




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  2. Deacs

    Deacs Well i am from Cumbria. Patron

    Details of how John died.
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  3. TTH

    TTH Senior Member

    At least your are doing something over there to remember the men who fought. We are in the final year of the centennial, and absolutely nobody seems to know it here in the United States. Sam Woodfill, Charles Whittlesey, and Frank Luke are forgotten, and even Eddie Rickenbacker and Alvin York are nearly so. It's shameful.
     
  4. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial

    I think the ongoing commemoration of Vimy Ridge is a big reason why it remains in the public eye here. The casualty rates also impacted every nook and cranny of what then was a thinly populated country.
     
  5. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Allastair Malcolm Cluny McReady-Diarmid:Victoria Cross,Grove Road Arnos Grove,London



    Captain MCREADY-DIARMID, ALLASTAIR MALCOLM CLUNY


    Died 01/12/1917

    Aged 29

    4th Bn. attd. 17th Bn.
    Middlesex Regiment

    V C

    Formerly Arthur Malcolm McReady-Drew. Son of Herbert L. Drew and Fanny A. Drew (nee McReady), of 71 Goldsmith Avenue, Acton; husband of Hilda McReady-Diarmid, of Springfield, Dursley, Gloucs. Born at New Southgate, Middlesex.


    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 12th March, 1918, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery and brilliant leadership. When the enemy penetrated some distance into our position and the situation was extremely critical, Capt. McReady-Diarmid at once led his company forward through a heavy barrage. He immediately engaged the enemy, with such success that he drove them back at least 300 yards, causing numerous casualties and capturing 27 prisoners. The following day the enemy again attacked and drove back another company which had lost all it's officers. This gallant officer at once called for volunteers and attacked. He drove them back again for 300 yards, with heavy casualties. Throughout this attack Capt. McReady-Diarmid led the way himself, and it was absolutely and entirely due to his marvellous throwing of bombs that the ground was regained. His absolute disregard for danger, his cheerfulness and coolness at a most trying time, inspired all who saw him. This most gallant officer was eventually killed by a bomb when the enemy had been driven right back to their original starting point."
    Casualty
    Commemorated at CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL

    Location: Nord, France
    Number of casualties: 7117

    Cemetery/memorial reference: Panel 9.

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  6. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Arthur Lascelles,Victoria Cross,Wandsworth Town Hall,London.
    Captain LASCELLES, ARTHUR MOORE
    Died 07/11/1918

    Aged 38

    3rd Bn.
    Durham Light Infantry

    V C, M C

    Son of John Lascelles, of Milford Hall, Newtown, Mont.; husband of Sophia Lascelles.


    INSCRIPTION
    UTTERLY REGARDLESS OF FEAR HE DIED FOR GOD KING AND COUNTRY
    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette," No. 30471, dated 8th Jan., 1918, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery, initiative and devotion to duty when in command of his company in a very exposed position. After a very heavy bombardment during which Capt. Lascelles was wounded, the enemy attacked in strong force but was driven off, success being due in a great degree to the fine example set by this officer, who, refusing to allow his wound to be dressed, continued to encourage his men and organise the defence. Shortly afterwards the enemy again attacked and captured the trench, taking several of his men prisoners. Capt. Lascelles at once jumped on to the parapet and followed by the remainder of his company, 12 men only, rushed across under very heavy machine-gun fire and drove over 60 of the enemy back, thereby saving a most critical situation. He was untiring in reorganising the position, but shortly afterwards the enemy again attacked and captured the trench and Capt. Lascelles, who escaped later. The remarkable determination and gallantry of this officer in the course of operations, during which he received two further wounds, afforded an inspiring example to all."



    Casualty
    Buried at DOURLERS COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

    Location: Nord, France
    Number of casualties: 193

    Cemetery/memorial reference: II. C. 24.

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    Last edited: Jun 25, 2018
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  7. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Edward Foster,Victoria Cross,Wandsworth Town Hall,London

    On 24 April 1917 at Villers-Plouich, Nord, France, during an attack, the advance was held up in a portion of the village by two machine-guns which were entrenched and strongly covered by wire entanglements. Corporal Foster, who was in charge of two Lewis guns, succeeded in entering the trench and engaging the enemy guns. One of the Lewis guns was lost, but the corporal rushed forward, bombed the enemy and recovered the gun. Then, getting his two guns into action, he killed the enemy gun team and captured their guns.[2]

    Foster was also awarded the Médaille Militaire by France.

    His VC is on display in the Lord Ashcroft Gallery at the Imperial War Museum, London.[3]


    Edward Foster (VC) - Wikipedia

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  8. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Reginald Haine,Victoria Cross,Wandsworth Town Hall,London

    Haine was 20 years old, and a second lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    On 28/29 April 1917 near Gavrelle, France,[1] when British troops were holding a salient which was being repeatedly counter-attacked by German forces, Second Lieutenant Haine organised and led six bombing attacks against a German strong point and captured the position, together with 50 prisoners and two machine-guns. The enemy at once counter-attacked and regained the lost ground, but Second Lieutenant Haine formed a "block" in his trench and for the whole of the following night maintained his position. Next morning he again attacked and recaptured the position. His splendid example inspired his men during more than 30 hours of continuous fighting.[2]
    Reginald Leonard Haine - Wikipedia

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  9. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Ferdinand West,Victoria Cross,Westminster Gardens,London

    He was 22 years old, and a captain in No. 8 Squadron, Royal Air Force during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    On 12 August 1918, the British Army was intending to start a major offensive, but it needed information about the enemy positions. Setting off at dawn, West and his observer, Lt. William Haslam, flying an Armstrong Whitworth FK 8 (serial number C8602), spotted an enemy concentration through a hole in the mist. Avoiding severe ground fire, almost immediately they came under attack from seven German fighter aircraft and West was hit in the leg, and his radio transmitter was smashed.

    Continuing to identify his location, he remained under attack and manoeuvred his machine so skilfully that his observer was able to get several good bursts into the enemy machines, which drove them away. Only when he was sure of the enemy’s position did he attempt to break off and head for his own lines. He twisted his trouser leg into a tourniquet to stem the flow of blood from his wounds. Unable to make his airfield West landed behind the Allied lines and insisted on reporting his findings despite being in excruciating agony. His left leg had five wounds, one of which had shattered his femur and cut the femoral artery, and had to be amputated.[2][3]
    Freddie West - Wikipedia

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  10. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    George Cartwright,Victoria Cross,Sloane Square,London


    On 9 December 1915—his 21st birthday—Cartwright enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force for service during the First World War. Allotted to the newly raised 33rd Battalion—an infantry battalion raised in New South Wales—as a private, he embarked aboard HMAT Marathon at Sydney on 4 May 1916.[4][5] Disembarking at Devonport, England, two months later,[6] the members of the 33rd Battalion spent the following four months training at Larkhill Camp on Salisbury Plain.[3][7]

    After the 3rd Division, to which the 33rd Battalion was assigned, deployed to the Western Front in November 1916, Cartwright served with them through the Battle of Messines where he was wounded in June 1917. Later, in April 1918, he was wounded again when the 33rd Battalion's position was attacked with gas while holding a position around Villers-Bretonneux.[8] He was briefly hospitalised but returned to duty in June.[2] In August, the Allies launched the Hundred Days Offensive around Amiens, which resulted in a series of advances as the Allies sought to break through the Hindenburg Line.[9]

    On 31 August 1918, at Road Wood, south-west of Bouchavesnes, near Peronne, France, when two companies became held up by machine gun fire, Cartwright attacked the gun alone under intense fire. He shot three of the crew, and, having bombed the post, captured the gun and nine enemy soldiers. For his actions he was recommended for the Victoria Cross.[10] On 30 September 1918 he was wounded and evacuated to England.[8] Cartwright was conferred with his VC by King George V, and at the end of the war Cartwright was repatriated to Australia, arriving in March 1919 and as the AIF was demobilised, he was discharged on 16 May 1919.[2][5] For his war service he received the following medals: the Victoria Cross, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.[11]


    George Cartwright (soldier) - Wikipedia


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  11. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Victoria Cross,Jack Harvey,Burgess Park,Southwark,London

    On 2 September 1918 north of Peronne, France, when the advance of his company was held up by machine gun fire, Private Harvey dashed forward a distance of 50 yards alone, through the English barrage and in the face of heavy enemy fire. He rushed a machine gun post, shooting two of the team and bayoneting another. He then destroyed the gun and continued his way along the enemy trench. He single-handedly rushed an enemy dugout which contained 37 Germans and compelled them to surrender. These acts of gallantry saved the company heavy casualties and materially assisted in the success of the operation. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for these actions.[2]

    Harvey later achieved the rank of sergeant.
    Jack Harvey (VC) - Wikipedia


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  12. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Victoria Cross,Walter Rayfield,Richmond War Memorial,London

    Rayfield was 36 years old, and a private in the 7th (1st British Columbia) Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    These events took place from 2–4 September 1918 during the operations east of Arras, France:

    Ahead of his company, he rushed a trench occupied by a large party of the enemy, personally bayoneting two and taking ten prisoners. Later, he located and engaged with great skill, under constant rifle fire, an enemy sniper who was causing many casualties. He then rushed the section of trench from which the sniper had been operating, and so demoralised the enemy by his coolness and daring that thirty others surrendered to him. Again, regardless of his personal safety, he left cover under heavy machine-gun fire and carried in a badly wounded comrade..[1]

    Walter Leigh Rayfield - Wikipedia

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  13. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Victoria Cross,Robert Spall,Spencer Road ,Acton,London

    Sergeant SPALL, ROBERT
    Service Number 475212

    Died 13/08/1918

    Aged 25

    Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment)

    V C

    Son of Charles and Annie Maria Spall.
    CITATION

    An extract from "The London Gazette," dated 26th Oct., 1918, records the following

    "For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice when, during an enemy counter-attack, his platoon was isolated. Thereupon Serjt. Spall took a Lewis gun and, standing on the parapet, fired upon the advancing enemy, inflicting very severe casualties. He then came down the trench directing the men into a sap seventy-five yards from the enemy. Picking up another Lewis gun, this gallant N.C.O. again climbed the parapet, and by his fire held up the enemy. It was while holding up the enemy at this point that he was killed. Serjt. Spall deliberately gave his life in order to extricate his platoon from a most difficult situation, and it was owing to his bravery that the platoon was saved."
    Casualty

    Robert Spall - Wikipedia

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  14. Deacs

    Deacs Well i am from Cumbria. Patron

    This paving stone seems to be confusing as he seems to have 2 stones one that I have taken at Carlisle and one seems to have been laid at Jarrow ?
    So here is the one from Carlisle.


    Second Lieutenant COLLIN, JOSEPH HENRY

    Died 09/04/1918
    Aged 24
    4th Bn.
    King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)
    V C
    Son of Joseph and Mary Collin, of 8, Petteril Terrace, Harraby, Carlisle.


    Joseph Henry Collin - Wikipedia
    Citation.
    For most conspicuous bravery, devotion to duty and self-sacrifice in action. After offering a long and gallant resistance against heavy odds in the Keep held by his platoon, this officer, with only five of his men remaining, slowly withdrew in the face of superior numbers, contesting every inch of the ground. The enemy were pressing him hard with bombs and machine-gun fire from close range. Single-handed 2nd Lt. Collin attacked the machine gun and team. After firing his revolver into the enemy, he seized a Mills grenade and threw it into the hostile team, putting the gun out of action, killing four of the team and wounding two others. Observing a second hostile machine gun firing, he took a Lewis gun, and selecting a high point of vantage on the parapet whence he could engage the gun, he, unaided, kept the enemy at bay until he fell mortally wounded. The heroic self-sacrifice of 2nd Lt. Collin was a magnificent example to all.

    — The London Gazette, 25 June 1918[3]
    His Victoria Cross is displayed at the King's Own Royal Regiment Museum, Lancaster, England.

    8 Petteril Terrace – Home of Joseph Henry Collin VC
    Joseph Henry Collin was born on 10th April, 1893 in Jarrow, County Durham, and later moved to Carlisle, living with his parents Joseph and Mary Collin at 8, Petteril Terrace, Harraby. Collin was educated at St. Patrick’s School, on Albert Street (now part of Georgian Way).

    At the outbreak of war, Collin was 21 years old and was working as an Assistant Salesman at Hepworth & Sons, tailor on English Street. Like many of his fellow young men, Collin felt it his duty to sign up to the armed forces and in 1915 enlisted in the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders.

    After serving with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in France, and following promotion to Sergeant, Collin was selected for a commission by the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. He was posted to France in October 1917, serving as a 2nd Lieutenant to the 1/4th Battalion.

    On 9 April 1918, the day before his 25th birthday, during extremely heavy fighting near Givenchy, Collin was killed in action. He was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for the following act of bravery in his final moments:-

    “For most conspicuous bravery, devotion to duty and self-sacrifice in action.

    After offering a long and gallant resistance against heavy odds in the Keep held by his platoon, this officer, with only five of his men remaining, slowly withdrew in the face of superior numbers, contesting every inch of the ground. The enemy were pressing him hard with bombs and machine-gun fire from close range. Single-handed 2nd Lieutenant Collin attacked the machine gun team. After firing his revolver into the enemy, he seized a Mills grenade and threw it into the hostile team, putting the gun out of action, killing four of the team and wounding two others. Observing a second hostile machine gun firing, he took a Lewis gun, and selecting a high point of vantage on the parapet whence he could engage the gun, he, unaided, kept the enemy at bay until he fell mortally wounded.

    The heroic self-sacrifice of 2nd Lieutenant Collin was a magnificent example to all.”

    2nd Lieutenant Joseph Henry Collin VC is buried in Vielle-Chapelle New Military Cemetery, France. In Carlisle his memory has been honoured by local schools competing for the ‘Collin Shield’. Collin Place, off Newtown Road was named in his memory and his name is listed on the Roman Catholic War Memorial, at Our Lady and St. Joseph’s, Warwick Road.

    This is a good site regarding Joseph and this seems to say he as 3 stones.
    Redirect Notice

    Here is the newspaper report from his stone at Jarrow.
    First World War hero honoured in Jarrow

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  15. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Victoria Cross.Cyril Frisby,Station Road ,New Barnet,London

    On 27 September 1918 at the Battle of Canal du Nord, near Graincourt, France, Captain Frisby was in command of a company detailed to capture a canal crossing, but when the canal was reached, the leading platoon came under annihilating fire from a strong enemy post under the bridge on the far side of the canal. Captain Frisby with a lance-corporal (Thomas Norman Jackson) and two others, climbed down into the canal under intense fire and succeeded in capturing the post with two machine-guns and 12 men. Then having consolidated his objective he gave timely support to a company which had lost all its officers and sergeants, organising the defences and beating off a heavy counter-attack.[2]
    Cyril Frisby - Wikipedia

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  16. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Viscount Gort,Victoria Cross,Embankment,London

    Victoria Cross citation

    Captain (Brevet Major, Acting Lieutenant-Colonel), 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards

    Citation: For most conspicuous bravery, skilful leading and devotion to duty during the attack of the Guards Division on 27th September 1918, across the Canal du Nord, near Flesquieres, when in command of the 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards, the leading battalion of the 3rd Guards Brigade. Under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire he led his battalion with great skill and determination to the "forming-up" ground, where very severe fire from artillery and machine guns was again encountered. Although wounded, he quickly grasped the situation, directed a platoon to proceed down a sunken road to make a flanking attack, and, under terrific fire, went across open ground to obtain the assistance of a Tank, which he personally led and directed to the best possible advantage. While thus fearlessly exposing himself, he was again severely wounded by a shell. Notwithstanding considerable loss of blood, after lying on a stretcher for awhile [sic], he insisted on getting up and personally directing the further attack. By his magnificent example of devotion to duty and utter disregard of personal safety all ranks were inspired to exert themselves to the utmost, and the attack resulted in the capture of over 200 prisoners, two batteries of field guns and numerous machine guns. Lt.-Col. Viscount Gort then proceeded to organise the defence of the captured position until he collapsed; even then he refused to leave the field until he had seen the "success signal" go up on the final objective. The successful advance of the battalion was mainly due to the valour, devotion and leadership of this very gallant officer.[19]



    John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort - Wikipedia


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  17. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Alfred Herring,Victoria Cross,Tottenham War Memorial ,London

    He was 29 years old, and a temporary second lieutenant in the Royal Army Service Corps,[2] British Army, attached to 6th (S) Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    On 23/24 March 1918 at Montagne Bridge, France, the enemy had gained a position on the south bank of the canal and Second Lieutenant Herring's post was surrounded, but he immediately counter-attacked and recaptured the position, together with 20 prisoners and six machine-guns. During the night the post was continually attacked, but all attacks were beaten off, largely because Lieutenant Herring was frequently visiting his men and cheering them up. It was owing to his bravery and magnificent handling of his troops that the enemy advance was held up for 11 hours at a very critical period.[3
    Alfred Cecil Herring - Wikipedia

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  18. CL1

    CL1 116th LAA and 92nd (Loyals) LAA,Royal Artillery Patron

    Robert Cruickshank,Victoria Cross,Tottenham War Memorial ,London

    He was 29 years old, and a Private in the 2/14th (County of London) Battalion, The London Regiment (London Scottish), British Army when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

    On 1 May 1918 east of the Jordan River, Palestine, in the midst of a pitched battle against Turkish troops, Private Cruickshank volunteered to take a message to company headquarters from his platoon which was in the bottom of a wadi, with its officer and most of the men casualties. The official War Office citation gave the following account:

    The platoon to which Private Cruickshank belonged came under very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire at short range and was led down a steep bank into a wadi, most of the men being hit before they reached the bottom. Immediately after reaching the bottom of the wadi the officer in command was shot dead, and the sergeant who then took over command sent a runner back to Company Headquarters asking for support, but was mortally wounded almost immediately after; the corporal having in the meantime been killed, the only remaining N.C.O. (a lance-corporal), believing the first messenger to have been killed, called for a volunteer to take a second message back. Private Cruickshank immediately responded and rushed up the slope, but was hit and rolled back into the wadi bottom. He again rose and rushed up the slope, but, being again wounded, rolled back into the wadi. After his wounds had been dressed he rushed a third time up the slope and again fell badly wounded. Being now unable to stand he rolled himself back amid a hail of bullets. His wounds were now of such a nature as to preclude him making any further attempt and he lay all day in a dangerous position, being sniped at and again wounded here he lay. he displayed the utmost valour and endurance, and was cheerful and uncomplaining throughout. Citation for Private Robert Edward Cruickshank, Lond. R.
    Robert Edward Cruickshank - Wikipedia

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