The capture of General Ludwig Crüwell, General der Panzertruppe on the 29 May 1942

Discussion in 'North Africa & the Med' started by Steve Mac, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Steve,

    Excellent, thanks. That pinpoints it exactly. We're aiming to release the article on Friday, but have to do a few more fiddly corrections first.

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  2. Andreas

    Andreas Working on two books

    Hi Andrew

    Does your account confirm the story in Mitcham?

    Look forward to the article!

    All the best

    Andreas
     
  3. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Hi Andreas,

    Ludwig Crüwell's account of the incident, which we include in our article, confirms that they were lost and hit by ground-fire before going down, and I think it was Mitcham's source too. Will send you an email this evening.

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  4. Lindele

    Lindele formerly HA96

    Hi Andrew,
    during your research for your article, did you ever try to contact the Crüwell Family?

    Stefan.
     
  5. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Hi Stefan,

    I didn't think of that, because my focus was entirely on the Wüstennotstaffel. But now that you mention it, there are only nine people in the German phonebook with that surname, so it shouldn't be too hard to track down his descendants. If this article ever becomes a book, that is something that I'll certainly do.

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  6. Lindele

    Lindele formerly HA96

    Hi Andrew,

    I have another idea which worked in my investigations for a German Officer which died long after WW2. I try that route next week for you.

    Stefan.
     
    Andrew Arthy likes this.
  7. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Hi Stefan,

    Thank you very much for that. I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  8. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Hello Andrew,

    I have just clicked into your link at message #17, but it shows Part Two of your Wüstennotstaffel Article has yet to be released. Is there a delay and if so, when do you expect it to be released?

    Further, would you be content for me to 'quote' part of the article relating to the theme of this thread, trusting that I will fully acknowledge the source of the information and provide a link to it?

    Best,

    Steve.
     
  9. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Hello Steve,

    Unfortunately the article has been delayed because we need to do some major revisions to three of the maps. Because we are only hobby publishers, things don't always get done quickly (and that's also the reason we generally don't provide exact publishing dates!).

    Please do quote part of the article if you wish, with full acknowledgement of the source and a link. And I'll be sure to announce the release of the article as soon as it's available (hopefully next week).

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  10. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Many thanks, Andrew. Your permission to quote from the Article is much appreciated.

    I (and I am sure others here on the forum) look forward to your announcement!

    Best,

    Steve.
     
  11. Andrew Arthy

    Andrew Arthy Junior Member

    Hi Steve (and anyone else interested),

    I'm very happy to announce that Part Two of our Wüstennotstaffel eArticle is now available for download from our website: http://www.airwarpublications.com/earticles/frontline. The article covers the history of the German desert rescue squadron between May 1942 and May 1943 (Part One covered May 1941 to May 1942).

    Aside from the story of the capture of General der Panzertruppe Ludwig Crüwell, the 5,500 word article covers several other fascinating events, including the capture of a Wüstennotstaffel pilot by SAS and LRDG soldiers involved in the Sidi Haneish raid in July 1942, a nocturnal German sabotage operation in the opening stages of Rommel's Gazala offensive in late-May 1942, and descriptions of several of the Wüstennotstaffel's desert rescues of Axis and British personnel.

    We have been able to include first-hand accounts from various German and British airmen and soldiers of all ranks, and hope that people find our story to be of interest.

    All the best,
    Andrew A.
     
  12. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    From 'Wüstennotstaffel - Part Two' by Adam Thompson & Andrew Arthy [Air War Publications]; link: http://www.airwarpub...cles/frontline.

    *
    Although the article is suggestive, it is still not clear to me exactly who shot down the aeroplane carrying General Crüwell. Was it 'C' Company Green Howards, was it British mobile units operating in or around Cappuzo Gap, was it the Italians?

    However, in Appendix 1 it states:

    *
    I'll now look for evidence corroborating this!
     
  13. Lindele

    Lindele formerly HA96

    Hi Steve Mac,
    it took a little bit longer and I still do not have all we wanted from the family of General Crüwell. I have been able to track the whereabouts of the General’s daughter Renate. Unfortunately I did not receive any answers yet. I have a couple of more options with another part of the family, but these are not as good. I will get back as soon as I have more information.

    Stefan.
     
    Andrew Arthy likes this.
  14. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Unfortunately, the capture of General Ludwig Crüwell is not mentioned in the regimental history ‘The Story of The Green Howards 1939-1945‘ (Synge).
     
  15. Flamula

    Flamula Member

    In the 1942 war diary for the 5th Green Howards there's an appendix (5 page report) detailing the destruction of the 150th brigade at Rotonda Ualeb (or Rotunda Ualeb, Sidi Muftah Box) it makes for harrowing reading, and this includes an entry mentioning General Crüwell:-

    "29th May... A German recce plane crash lands in the area of C Company, 4th Green Howards, and GENERAL CRUEWELL, who is a passenger is taken prisoner. "A" Squadron R.T.R. is detailed to escort to 69th Infantry Brigade area the 6th Green Howards who have been acting with Divisional Mobile Reserve and to hand over to 50th Division GENERAL CRUEWELL."
    If I come across any further info I'll be sure to add it.

     
    Steve Mac likes this.
  16. Flamula

    Flamula Member

    I just picked up a book which contains an excellent overview of this event, I'm not sure on the copyright issues with quoting published material here so will hold off for now, but can add the info if anyone can confirm I'm allowed to do so.

    "50th At Bay - The Years of Defeat" - B.S. Barnes. (Published by Helion 2018)

    This contains an account of the crash, a report from one of the soldiers witnessing the General's Knights Cross and Signet ring going 'missing' and Major Mander's initial interrogation. Even more notably, there is General Crüwell's own account of the crash.
     
    Chris C likes this.
  17. DavidW

    DavidW Well-Known Member

    Hi Flamula.

    That book is on my to buy list. I would appreciate your opinion of it when you have read it.

    Kind regards,
    David.
     
    Flamula likes this.
  18. Flamula

    Flamula Member

    Hi David,

    I've just finished it, it is an enjoyable book and one that will serve as good reference for its subject matter.

    Essentially B.S. Barnes has amassed a catalogue of first person recollections and anecdotes which he's interspersed with background information and historical context to provide more of a narrative throughout the timeline. So it contains a lot of interesting info from a wide range of sources. There are a couple pictures in there I'd not seen before, from Dunkirk and Gazala in particular. At circa 270 pages, it would only be improved in more of the same, extra maps, accounts and pictures, but of course these are thin on the ground and all in all the author has done a great job here.

    I'd be interested to know if you've any particular books of note you recommend, I've more than a few now but always on the look out for more - my area of interest in particular at the moment is the 150th Infantry Brigade (50th Div) - my Grandad was in 232 Royal Engineers, and after surviving Gazala, the 233 Royal Engineers for the duration of the war.
     
  19. Steve Mac

    Steve Mac Very Senior Member

    Hello Flamula,

    Books you will find of interest (if you do not already have them) are:

    1. '150th Infantry Brigade (50th (Northumbrian) Division) in the Middle East June 1941 - June 1942', (WE Bush and others); and

    2. 'From the Gazala Line to Behind The Lines - Wartime Memories of John Cowtan'.

    The latter person was Lt. D Cowton, 232nd Field Coy, RE. He was taken PoW at Gazala and so, the book is only partly about his time with the 232nd Field Coy, RE.

    You may find this thread of interest: 232nd Field Company Royal Engineers

    Best,

    Steve.
     
    Flamula likes this.
  20. Flamula

    Flamula Member

    Many thanks Steve!

    By coincidence I began reading John Cowtan's memoir this morning. Very good recommendations, I was lucky enough to find a copy of the first book by W E Bush you mentioned a couple of weeks back, some great maps of the individual unit positions during the encirclement there.

    E W Clay's the path of the 50th is next on my list to get hold of, I'm not sure whether the reprint contains all the maps the original does, so any info on that would be great if you have it. I'm also yet to get hold of the war diaries for 232 coy RE 1941/1942 and 233 Coy RE 1943 could be tricky at this current time I suppose.

    Thanks for the link to the 232 thread too, you've covered a lot of ground there - I'll be sure to join in once I've something to offer.
     

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