Images of Japanese surrender to 2nd AIF.

Discussion in 'War Against Japan' started by Waddell, Jul 4, 2020.

  1. Waddell

    Waddell Well-Known Member

    I came across these again today and thought them worth sharing here. Many years ago a family friend was helping me with some images for a First World War story I was writing. Whilst doing that he gave me copies of these images which were scanned from photographs given to him by an acquaintance he no longer remembered. So, unfortunately, I cannot add any further details to them other than to say they are from the south west pacific- I suspect New Guinea or the Islands.

    Any thoughts or comments welcome.

    Here are the first four. Jap surrender 1.jpg Jap surrender 2.jpg Jap surrender 3.jpg Jap surrender 4.jpg

    Scott

    Final four.

    Scott Jap surrender 5.jpg Jap surrender 6.jpg Jap surrender 8.jpg Jap surrender 9.jpg
     
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  2. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    I'd love to know the story behind the two men with swords on their shoulders in the first picture. Was that something that was done often?
     
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  3. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Great photos. To be technical, these are cutlasses rather than swords. Cutlasses are carried for ceremonial purposes by Senior and occasionally by Leading Ratings. The only times I have come across their use in modern times is when escorting the Colours or by the escort to a Rating at a Court Martial. Presumably they are in the photo to add effect to the occasion.

    Tim
     
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  4. JimHerriot

    JimHerriot Ready for Anything

    "Boy, watch that knife!"

    I'll wager that Dave55 will get it first, but notwithstanding the time zone differences timuk is in with a good shout (and I do not underestimate the knowledge of either, ever!)

    Kind regards, always,

    Jim.
     
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  5. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA Patron

    ;) You know me too well.

    I'll wait a bit for others who's minds are also filled with such important information.
     
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  6. Ewen Scott

    Ewen Scott Well-Known Member

    Possibly Major General Yamamura surrendering Japanese forces in Borneo at Kuching. If that is the case then the ship is the Bathurst class HMAS Kapunda. Or the surrender at Koepang, Timor on board HMAS Warrnambool. Probably the latter is more likely.
     
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  7. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Rather think the surrender at Koepang was on board HMAS Moresby on 11 Sep 45.

    Tim
     
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  8. Ewen Scott

    Ewen Scott Well-Known Member

    You are right. Warrnambool was present but surrender was signed on Moresby.

    I’m now doubting my initial thoughts of the first photo being taken on a Bathurst. The raised (gun?) platform on the rhs is too far aft for a Bathurst. (It would be above the minesweeping winch if it was a Bathurst). But it could well fit the quarterdeck layout of Moresby.
     
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  9. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    This photo of the surrender on board HMS Moresby doesn't tie in with the original photo.
    From Surrender of the Japanese in the Timor area, World War II | naa.gov.au
    upload_2020-7-5_11-31-6.jpeg
    This is a black-and-white photograph taken on 11 September 1945 showing Major Minoru Shoji, the Chief Of Staff of Colonel Kaida Tatsuichi of the Imperial Japanese Army, signing the Instrument of Surrender during the surrender ceremony aboard HMAS Moresby at sea off Timor. Colonel Kaida Tatsuichi, General Officer commanding Japanese forces in the area, is signing at the same time. Tatsuichi is seated to Shoji's right with his back directly to the camera.

    Tim
    Edit: Nor does it seem that the original looks like the surrender at Kuching. See:
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2020
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  10. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

  11. Waddell

    Waddell Well-Known Member

    Thank you Tim. As I mentioned I have had them for years and know little about them. I am glad they are of interest to others.

    Scott
     
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  12. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Thanks to a member of the FEPOW Family, I have the answer regarding the remaining photographs. They are in New Guinea and the response I got was:
    It's at Kiarivu, south of Wewak on Sept 11, 1945. Japanese Army Lt General Hatazo Adachi, commander of the 18th Army accompanied by his staff arrived at the front lines occupied by C Company, 2/7 Infantry Battalion and were escorted to Battalion Headquarters. Weakened, Adachi sat in a seat carried by four men and on Sept 12 departed for Maprik.
    At the time of surrender only 13,000 of the 18th Army's original strength of 100,000 troops survived the war.

    Tim
     
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  13. Waddell

    Waddell Well-Known Member

    Thanks for taking the time to identify them Tim.

    Scott
     
  14. BarbaraWT

    BarbaraWT Member

    These photos are really interesting. Regarding the first photo- my initial thought is the men don’t look Australian. The uniforms aren’t familiar nor the way they stand. Looking at the other photos I can see Australian slouch hats and towering men!
     
  15. Waddell

    Waddell Well-Known Member

    Hi Barbara,

    They are definitely Australians. The senior Australian army officers are wearing khaki peaked caps ( you can see the same uniform being worn by the officers in the other photos, other ranks wearing slouch hats). There are also some RAN personnel pictured in the first photograph. The Americans were all pretty far north of New Guinea by that time.

    Scott
     
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  16. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    The 1901P pattern cutlass was carried as a sea service weapon on most RN and RAN vessels until after the end of WW2 They would be held in the ship's armoury to be issued as and when needed (practically never). Possibly the last time used in anger was when HMS Cossack boarded the Altmark.
     
  17. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    The RN Cutlass was withdrawn from service as a weapon in 1936. As regards the Cossack/Altmark incident the carrying of cutlasses is disputed by most. Only one witness (not part of the boarding party) claims to have seen a cutlass and even he stated this was one of the four carried onboard HMS Cossack for ceremonial purposes.

    Tim
     
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  18. timuk

    timuk Well-Known Member

    Barbara,
    See my link to HMAS Burkdekin in #10. It contains a list of the officers attending the surrender ceremony and includes Australian, British, American and Dutch representatives.

    Tim
     

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