Junker 88 fin identitiy

Discussion in 'The War In The Air' started by Daniel O'Sullivan, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. Daniel O'Sullivan

    Daniel O'Sullivan New Member

    Does anyone know how we can find out any info about this fin from a Junker 88. It was shot down over Croydon in London. This debris was recovered and painted with a Hampden breaking through the swastica in classic English style. It was hung for years on the Croydon air detachment wall, until a VERY unwise officer decided to throw it out; and it was swiftly procured.


    The only markings on the fin we can find are AEG WILAV or WILDAU.


    10166


    88.372-10


    63 or 83.
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. HA96

    HA96 Member

    It is Wildau, see below
    Wildau - Wikipedia
     
  3. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Under the Ju 88 Plan of 1939 Division 1 consisted of Henschel, Arado and AEG Wildau. AEG built tail units. Division 1 built 80 Ju 88s

    See Demystifying the German “armament miracle” during World War II.
    New insights from the annual audits of German aircraft producers
    - Lutz Budraß, Jonas Scherner, and Jochen Streb
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2019
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  4. KevinBattle

    KevinBattle Senior Member

    So, using the above information, presumably we are looking at a production run of just 80 Ju88 bombers?
    303 were shot down during the Blitz and Battle of Britain, so perhaps a date for the aircraft loss would be the place to start?
    Using a Hampden also dates it to early in the War, and there must be records in local History Societies around Croydon recording crashed aircraft which could narrow the identity still further.
     
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  5. Blutto

    Blutto Plane Mad

    Here's reference to one in Croydon during 1944:
    Royal Air Force officers inspecting the wreckage of Junkers Ju 88 A-4 of 2/KG 54 Werks Nr 3661 which was shot down by anti-aircraft fire from 15,000 feet and crashed in the back gardens of Nos 64 to 66 Dagnall Park, Selhurst, Croydon at 10.10pm on 20 February 1944. One crew member was killed, and three baled out and were taken prisoner.(IWM Photograph collection)
     
  6. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    No the Junkers 1939 plan had Junkers plus five divisions each of three companies making and assembling sections of JU 88s into whole aircraft. Division 1 made 80 aircraft and the tail in question belonged to one of these.
     
  7. KevinBattle

    KevinBattle Senior Member

    part duplicate of answer below
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2019
  8. KevinBattle

    KevinBattle Senior Member

    So, you mean "Yes" like wot I said....

    Thanks, Blutto, but why would anyone paint a Hampden on a piece of wreckage displayed in "air detachment unit" (Cadets?) hut?
    By 1944 the Hampden was obsolete, so a Lanc would have been more likely, so to have been an aircraft brought down when the Hampden was still fairly new in service.
    Croydon was also used as a fighter base, not bomber.....
     
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  9. Robert-w

    Robert-w Well-Known Member

    Wot you said somewhat ambiguous. The total production run of Junkers 1939 was considerably higher.The number of JU88s with a tail made by AEG could not have been more than 80. Just to confuse matters ATG were also part of Junkers 1939 and made tails
     
  10. KevinBattle

    KevinBattle Senior Member

    Ahem, then what's ambiguous ISN'T what I said...
    Why be so pedantic, or do you have LEGIONS of fans, such as a CENTURION might have?
     
  11. Daniel O'Sullivan

    Daniel O'Sullivan New Member

    Very interesting line of enquiry that. All we know is appeared on the Croydon air cadet parade room wall and it was there years. No one knows the origin. You'd assume it was a local thing they found but who knows? That's very good info though; thank you.
     
  12. Daniel O'Sullivan

    Daniel O'Sullivan New Member

    Maybe number 63 as that is the only number written on it that seems to be a consecutive log.
     

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