Missing gliders of Operation Tonga D-Day

Discussion in 'Airborne' started by brithm, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Ludo,

    I only have the French versions of Mold's and Troutt's accounts. In Troutt's two accounts the course of events differ. In his letter he and his pal Jock Trail encounter the glider in a high place (un endroit plus en hauteur) and then afterwards meets Mold and Jamieson. In his longer version (recit) he correctly remembers meeting up with the two medics before the glider's arrival and mentions crossing a field when it descends and lands very close by, so close they drop to the ground for fear of being struck. He learns later that it contained engineers which might suggest he was putting it all together the best he could post war.

    In what appears to be a letter written by Ernie Mold he says the following:

    "Nous avons rencontré l’équipage d’un autre planeur qui était tombé près de Grangues"

    I believe there is a longer version by Mold where he describes the actual landing of the glider which seems to align with what we see in the photo. So yes it does strike me as being CN84, but I guess we should be prepared to change our mind if contrary evidence turns up later.

    Regards ...
     
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  2. Ludo68000

    Ludo68000 Junior Member

    look at this nice view of CN84:
    La Cour Bellevue with CN84.JPG the damaged port wing is visible

    and also the nice view of CN77 at St Evroult:
    St Evroult and CN77.JPG the glider is intact
     
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  3. Brian Garcia

    Brian Garcia New Member

    Can I just post an update on CN 77 (LH494), about which little is known (and can I say how impressed I am by poster's work and expertise here).

    The First Pilot ws S/Sgt D Rushton and my wife's father w/sgt P G Phillips. They took off from Harwell at 0130 hours 6th June. On board were seven soldiers, a jeep, trailer, motorcycle and two radio sets. Phillips was injured and taken prisoner. we have his Stalag Luft XIIA PoW card. Although he never spoke about it, he was on one of those death marches back from Poland to Germany as the Soviets advanced in 1945.
     
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  4. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Hi Brian and welcome,

    Thank you for the information on your father-in-law W/Sgt P G Phillips. We have been seeking a clearer picture of the Cour Bellevue glider which shows the serial on the detached tail section. Recently I came across the photo on the Beeldbank site here which has a zoom-in function. My first impression was LH 484, but it could also be interpreted as LH 494.

    La Cour Bellevue Glider Serial.JPG

    I have been reluctant to post as it could be argued it is not absolutely clear. The evidence up to this point has been in favour of the Horsa being CN 84 based on the account of Wally Troutt who claims there were Engineers on board. So as you can see it throws a bit of a spanner in the works if indeed CN 77's serial was LH 494?

    Regards ...
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2018
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  5. Ludo68000

    Ludo68000 Junior Member

    Dear Chuck, Dear Brian, Dear all,
    I can confirm LH494 as CN77.
    The following document can be found in WO361/503:
    upload_2018-8-5_16-39-19.png
    This proves we have to be careful with accounts.
    This probably means CN84 is the Saint Evroult glider and the Bellevue glider in CN77.
    The only problem I see is the damaged wing. I can't see a damaged wing on the St Evroult glider...
    Very interesting...all of this is interesting and fascinating.....
    Regards,
    Ludo
     
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  6. Brian Garcia

    Brian Garcia New Member

    Fascinating and informative, thank you Ludo and Cee.
    It's odd that the suspected LH494 seems to be the Bellevue one, as it seems to be fairly intact. The record seems to show that all the LH494 occupants survived, supporting this thesis, but perhaps odd because Sgt Phillips told his family the glider came down heavily and he was injured - a deep 18 inch laceration across the lower back apparently, which was roughly sewn up with string on the spot, leaving an unsightly scar.
    The hunt continues, and I plan to visit the chateau at some point.
     
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  7. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Brian,

    You have probably noticed there are quite a few photos of the glider taken over time as it slowly deteriorates. It looks like it struck an anti-glider pole. In Ludo's aerial post #42 you can see the sliced off wing to the front. The following photo at first glance looks like one already posted. However, it must have been taken early on as the ramp is still up and the cockpit is in a fairly good state. Notice that the electrical tower that should be seen in the background has been removed.

    a-british-transport-glider-in-normandy-1944-DYYPAC.jpg

    In another thread Ludo posted a pic of its upper ruder which is on display at the Pegasus Museum in Benouville.

    Cour Bellevue Rudder at Pegasus Memorial.jpg

    Regards ...
     
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  8. Ludo68000

    Ludo68000 Junior Member

    Dear Brian, Dear Cee,
    the rudder story of CN77 was told to me by Ben14. his grandfather took it to his garage where it stayed many years before giving it to Pegasus Memorial.
    the colour picture of CN77 is a German picture. You can see it in the book Red Devils by Georges Bernage
    the second picture is from a local history book: Gonneville Sur Mer 1939-1944 by Marthe Rambaud and Jean-Claude Bosquain
    Regards,

    Ludo
     

    Attached Files:

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