Naming vehicles

Discussion in 'Weapons, Technology & Equipment' started by kfz, Apr 9, 2007.

  1. KevinT

    KevinT Senior Member

    From Tank Alert by Ivor D Astley RA.
    He was in 59 AT Regt 43 Wessex Div.

    page 88.

    Our vehicles had some original names; here are a few from BHQ. The battery commander's carrier was 'British Lion' ; the Jeeps "London Pride" and "Welsh Harp"; the 15-cwts "English Rose" and "Portsmouth Lil"; the 3-tonners "Barmouth" and "Nelson" and last but not least in the BHQ convoy , the fitters' truck "Scotch Mist".

    Can anyone tell me the structure of this regiment.
    For example would the 15 cwts be Bedfords or Morris-Commercials, the 3 tonners Bedfords or Austins and what would the Fitters' truck have been?
    Thanks for any details.

    cheers
    Kevin
     
  2. ChrisR

    ChrisR Senior Member

    Here's an example of markings on a Royal Engineers bomb disposal vehicle. Unfortunately I don't know who, where or when, but I believe this photograph may have been taken in East Anglia.
    Does anybody know what the sign is on the drivers side front wing, as it looks more of an official insignia than the art work on the other wing?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

  4. plang876

    plang876 Worrier in the wasteland

    ChrisR,

    I'm fairly sure it'll be the RE Corps colours, two royal blue stripes on a red background.

    Although red normally shows up lighter in B/W photography and the dk blue stripes look very light I have come across this effect before on a B/W photo of the Corps colours - I believe it's due to whatever colour correction filter was used when the photo was taken.

    Regards, Paddy
     
  5. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WW2 Veteran WW2 Veteran

    Back in 2010 a forum member known as Slaphead was building a model vehicle and asked me for some info about tac signs
    http://www.ww2talk.com/forum/veteran-accounts/29318-%22my-stuart-honey-tank-i-remember-65-years-later%22-2.html

    At the time I replied
    It's your model mate !...... you do whatever you want want with it, but, perhaps just to annoy Owen, what about putting the 41 tac sign & the 78 Div Flash ?

    Please do me one final favour.

    If you can possibly paint a name on the side, please call it "Semper in Excretum".

    For the benefit of those who's dog Latin is not up to scratch that translates as "Always in the shit" and I've always considered this aptly summed up my Army career :smile:

    Best regards

    Ron
    The name Semper in Excretum was quite popular in Italy in 1945 :)
     
  6. ChrisR

    ChrisR Senior Member

    plang876 - that certainly makes sense. Thanks.
     
  7. Ramiles

    Ramiles Researching 9th Lancers, 24th L and SRY

    There's a ref. at least in "None Had Lances" p29 to...

    20200426_145211.jpg

    After saying goodbye to their Valentines, at the end of June, the 24th L then moved to Rottingdean, to a camp called "Harvey's Cross" on 1st August 1942.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2020
  8. FormB200d

    FormB200d New Member

    My Dad told me that his 11th RTR amphibious Buffaloes were all named after Durham pit villages
     
    Chris C likes this.
  9. Your Dad might have meant some of the B Sqn Buffalos? Because we know the names of almost all A & C Sqn Buffalos. A Sqn were all names of animals or Ancient characters, and while C Sqn were town names, but they do not seem to match Durham pit village names:
    SALISBURY
    SANDRINGHAM
    SCARBOROUGH
    SEDGEFIELD
    SELBY
    SEVENOAKS
    SHAFTESBURY
    SHEERNESS
    SHEFFIELD
    SHREWSBURY
    SIDCUP
    SKEGNESS
    SLOUGH
    SOUTH SHIELDS
    SOUTHAMPTON
    SOUTHEND
    SOUTHPORT
    SOUTHSEA
    SOUTHWARK
    STAFFORD
    STAINES
    STAMFORD
    STEENDORP
    STIRLING
    STOCKBRIDGE
    STOCKPORT
    STOKE
    STROUD
    SUTTON
    SWANAGE
    SWANSEA
    SWINDON

    Few B Sqn names are known, but it looks like they were not town/village names:
    SHARPSHOOTER
    SWASHBUCKLER
    SAILOR
    SABOTEUR

    As you can see, all names started with a 'S'.

    Michel
     
  10. m kenny

    m kenny Senior Member

    Sedgefield is in Durham and South Shields is at the mouth of the River Tyne. I suppose to someone not from the north it would be an easy mistake to assume they were 'pit villages'.
     

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