What are you reading at the moment?

Discussion in 'Books, Films, TV, Radio' started by Gage, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Please to have given some small assistance towards the content of this family memoir:

    roll on.jpg
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  2. kopite

    kopite Member

    Well done Steve!

    I just read the preview on Amazon and saw your name and website cited in the Acknowledgements. It also mentions some places in the Liverpool area I’m very familiar with. It looks a very interesting book and I’ll most likely order a copy to read.
  3. bamboo43

    bamboo43 Very Senior Member

    Thanks Steve. The book is a nice family memoir, put together by Tommy Roberts' daughter, it has opened up some more avenues for me and my research. :)
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  4. Drew5233

    Drew5233 #FuturePilot 1940 Obsessive

    Currently reading The Royal Navy at Dunkirk by Martin Mace. First WW2 book I've picked up properly in close to 12 months and enjoying it.
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  5. Seroster

    Seroster Canadian researcher Patron

    Just finished Flying to Victory and I think it is excellent. I knew nothing about the chiefly bad relations between British army and air force in the early part of the war. They were lucky to have O'Connor and Collishaw working harmoniously together to conduct operations against the Italians. (And Tedder does not come out smelling like roses in all of this.)
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  6. Orwell1984

    Orwell1984 Senior Member


    Interesting study of an airfield used by both sides in the SCW. Lots of great images.
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  7. Seroster

    Seroster Canadian researcher Patron

    Currently reading this. After reading the book about Collishaw which focuses really on the high level - this book is the opposite and in fact I feel it is even a little constrictive - I don't think it talks enough about the big picture. But there's a great wealth of detail here.

    Also, it's touted as a "reference" and I think it could do with an index.

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  8. Orwell1984

    Orwell1984 Senior Member


    The End of the Beginning: Symposium on the Land/Air Co-operation in the Mediterranean War, 1940-43

    picked this up because it was referenced in another book I was reading some interesting articles in here:
    . It's the collection from a 1992 symposium at Bracknell held the RAF Historical society and RAF Staff College. A number of war time air men attended and contributed.in the smaller discussion groups and their comments are worth the price of the book alone.

    Can be downloaded here for free:
    RAF Historical Society Journals | Collections | Research | RAF Museum
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  9. A-58

    A-58 Not so senior Member

    I love anything with P-40s!
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  10. canuck

    canuck Token Colonial Patron

    Collishaw should be a Canadian household name but always seemed to be under appreciated. Billy Bishop got all the glory but Raymond ended WW1 with 60 victories, as an RNAS pilot, third highest kills of the British Empire. Some historians credit him with 81 (unofficial) kills. He was much decorated with the CB, DSO & Bar, OBE, DSC and DFC. By all accounts, he performed admirably in Egypt with limited and antiquated resources.

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  11. Seroster

    Seroster Canadian researcher Patron

    Tedder seems to get most of the glory for organizing things in the Desert Air Force but fundamentally (according to the book) Collishaw was basically responsible for keeping his HQ with the army's and for determining the air force's priorities: obtain air superiority, keep the enemy on his back foot so that (hopefully) they waste planes on constant defensive patrols, pick ground targets to disrupt supplies, avoid ground targets with heavy AA defense to prevent high casualties, resist army demands for CONSTANT defensive patrols of your own.
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  12. Markyboy

    Markyboy Member

    [​IMG] I've just finished this one, and I can't recommend it highly enough. There's even a whole chapter on Collishaw, so it links in with some of the titles mentioned above. The author was a pre war armourer who volunteered to be an air gunner, initially in Audax aircraft and then Lysanders in Egypt. Accepted for pilot training he went to Rhodesia and was posted to England flying Hurricane IIB fighter bombers. He then converted to Typhoons, flying many operations in the lead up to D-Day. Finally, he attended an advanced Armourers course, which resulted in him becoming a booby trap expert, running training courses to a variety of personnel. Altogether a very varied pre and wartime career.
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