Ford Tc (and strange camo schemes)

Discussion in 'Modelling' started by zerkalli, Oct 15, 2007.

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  1. zerkalli

    zerkalli Member

    Ford Tc - RPM 35012 - 1:35




    :group2:
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    That looked fun to make.
    What was the kit itself like?

    A different model than we normally see, cheers.


    [​IMG]
     
  3. zerkalli

    zerkalli Member

  4. kfz

    kfz Very Senior Member

    Looks good Z. Love the first world war style lozenge scheme.

    I wonder how effective that is, modern thinking is back toward disruptive patterns ,as opposed to trying to simulate something
     
  5. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    I like strange camo patterns:
    [​IMG]
     
  6. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Strange camo pattern, but it's good. Nice tank too!
     
  7. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    Strange camo pattern, but it's good.
    Go on Marcus, tell us why that Cheiftain is painted like that.
    Impress us, take our breath away.
     
  8. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    And since ferrets are the evening's theme:
    [​IMG]

    And a brace of 432's:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Go on Marcus, tell us why that Cheiftain is painted like that.
    [


    Ok, ok. At a guess, it's a pattern that was initially designed for ships during WW1 to make them harder to hit than normal ships, as the zigzag lines 'distorted' their shape, speed and direction to hunting U-boats.
    I presume this is the same idea for Tanks. I've done a quick search for Cheiftain and it seems it was more a city weapon, meaning the colours would help amongst buildings and debris.
    So? How was that? Am I right?:)
     
  10. Owen

    Owen -- --- -.. MOD

    I've done a quick search for Cheiftain and it seems it was more a city weapon,

    Hardly, tanks aren't too good in built up areas.

    This is right.
    meaning the colours would help amongst buildings and debris

    Which city in particular?
    I've given you a clue, (look for a song title in my earlier post.)
    This garrison's badge was known as "the Flaming Arsehole."
     
  11. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Haha. The only song title I can see is 'Take my breath away' which doesn't offer much help. Just found this site:

    index

    so I'll say Berlin?????
     
  12. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    This garrison's badge was known as "the Flaming Arsehole."


    That'll be the 5th Indian division then?
     
  13. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Haha. The only song title I can see is 'Take my breath away' which doesn't offer much help. Just found this site:

    Index

    so I'll say Berlin?????
    You've got it Marcus.
    The weird scheme is indeed related to naval dazzle patterns & belongs (belonged) to the armoured contingent of the Berlin Infantry Brigade from 1982 onwards. Designed to give maximum disruption amongst buildings and rubble it is actually surprisingly effective.
    Good Summary here:
    Berlin_Brigade

    Nice one.

    Any other peculiar schemes? I suppose the Caunter is pretty odd but also so familiar I tend to take it for granted.
     
  14. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    Caunter? Never heard of it before. Just looked it up.
    Is this it:

    (Quote)
    The Caunter Scheme comprised a series camouflage paints used on British and Commonwealth vehicles in the M.T.O in 1940/41. It was not known by that name at the time of application, but it has been adopted since because it was apparently developed by one Col. Caunter of the 4th Armoured Brigade. It used three colours, Light Stone, Silver Grey and Slate in a horizontal splinter pattern.

    Xtracolor has recently released these colours in semi-gloss enamels in their usual 14ml tinlets.

    The colours appear to be very accurate and match quite closely the swatches in Mike Starmer's book on the subject. (Editor's Note: indeed, the paints were matched to a very rare British Standards book dated 1942. This is where the BSC381C reference comes from). (End quote) ?
     
  15. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    That's the one, nice shot of an A10 in that plumage here:
    A10 Cruiser

    And then there's this:
    [​IMG]
    "Considerable latitude was given to Patrol commanders [...] in the methods of camouflaging their equipment. In the last respect "G" Patrol adopted an original colour scheme. We took each of them off in turn to a helpful paint shop where it was sprayed the most glorious pink, yellow and green. If they did not elude detection from enemy aircraft they would at least dazzle them. When first sprayed, they did look a little flashy. Corporal Inwood [...] said he would not be seen in Cairo driving such a thing, but discipline overcame embarassment. [...] I assured my troops that the colours would soon tone down and that the trucks would become as good as chameleons eventually."
    (Alaistair Timpson, In Rommel's Backyard, Leo Cooper 2000, Page 78)
    LRDG Vehicles - Patrol Structure and Camouflage
     
  16. marcus69x

    marcus69x I love WW2 meah!!!

    THat's a funny one. But even if the colours did fade down in the sun, Yellow, Pink and Green don't sound like an Ideal colour scheme for Desert warfare??
     
  17. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

  18. Bodston

    Bodston Little Willy

    I found these while googling a while ago. Just waiting for a thread to dump em in.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

  20. von Poop

    von Poop Adaministrator Admin

    Japanese Type 90 in Winter colours:
    [​IMG]
    Paint
     

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