United States Coast Guard at Normandy

Discussion in 'US Units' started by Drew5233, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. CommanderChuff

    CommanderChuff Senior Member

    Hallo michel,

    I am interested in the home ports for the British based UScg boats, I believe that these were newhaven,Portland and Dover. There is a distinct lack of small craft for a ww2 scenario in my model of Folkestone harbour so I am hoping that one or two were based there.

    Would you have any info, please , with thanks,
     
  2. The US Coast Guard Cutters were apparently all based in Poole.

    As for the landing craft and landing ships, the Green List has nothing for Folkestone, either US or British. The nearest harbour listed is Dover with eight fuelling trawlers located in Dover and nothing else.

    Michel
     
  3. DannyM

    DannyM Member

    Hi,
    There were at least four USCG CGC at Dover.

    They left Dover on the 16th May for Poole.

    They were USCG CGC 83439, 83445, 83439, 83503.

    I don’t have any other information on their arrival at Dover of if there were any others based there before they left for Poole unfortunately.

    Regards

    Danny
     
  4. CommanderChuff

    CommanderChuff Senior Member

    Thank you for the responses. The story of Folkestone in the war is getting a little clearer now with information arriving from several knowledgeable people.
     
  5. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    Follow up on more information on ResFlotOne
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  6. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    A table I’ve made for the above information on the previous post. As always, if anyone has additional information (such as Vessel Commanders Names) I would be please if you could post it for me

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  7. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    I wanted to edit the above post, but couldn’t figure out how to do that on this site, sorry......re formatted the chart so it reads a little better (I think).

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  8. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    Communication Orders for Force “L”. RESFLOT ONE is in these orders. I believe the “serials” before each vessel is the “call sign number” they were to use when communicating. I’m not positive (maybe other’s could advise) as the orders do not seem to detail what these numbers mean

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  9. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    Sorry, can’t see to edit the about to add this page

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  10. Roy Martin

    Roy Martin Senior Member

    Temujin,
    Many thanks for posting. Can't cast any light on the meaning of the numbers, but what an amazing collection of ships, of several nationalities: tugs, salvage vessel, repair ships, danlayers, sweepers, HQ ship etc. Interestingly not all of the ships listed actually went to the 'far shore' and there are omissions - for instance the Abigail's pair was the Help, which does seem to be there.
     
  11. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    An update to my chart on Rescue Flotilla One. I contacted the US Coast Guard Museum for additional info on CO’s, and they sent me to Archival Operations - Washington, DC, in which I was able to add more names on my list. Unfortunately because of the large number of documents that they have to review, they could only do about 6 names (which allowed me to complete the cutter’s assigned to Force ‘S’), and I’ll have to try and get the rest by visiting the archives (which may or may not happen)......but, I have been able to update my chart AND, if anyone has more info or names, would love to get it

    Cheers
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  12. The number before each vessel is its call sign, to be inserted as an addendum to S.P. 2573 (European Theatre Call Sign Book for British and US Naval Forces) prepared for use in Operation NEPTUNE.

    Michel
     
  13. KathyW

    KathyW New Member

    Does anyone have information about what sector CG-13 (83372) was assigned to as part of the USCG Rescue Flotilla One during the Invasion of Normandy?
    My dad served aboard CG-13. She was nicknamed "The Lucky 13" because she and her crew survived a number of close calls.
    He rarely spoke about his wartime experience. I've read most of the information on the USCG's website about the cutters history and pivotal rescue missions.
    Any pictures or information would be greatly appreciated.
    Kathy
    His name was Dale E Wallace (MoMM1C)
     
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  14. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    On D Day, CG13 was part of FORCE ‘O’ - Convoy O-3

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  15. KathyW

    KathyW New Member

    Temujin,
    Thanks so much for this information. Would you happen to know how many of the cutters survived the Invasion?
     
  16. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    All of them survived D day.......One Cutter did NOT arrive in Poole before D. Day, it arrived on the 17 Jun.

    2 Cutters were damaged AFTER D Day on 21 Jun 1944.

    USCGC CG-83415 [​IMG] United States Navy The 83-foot patrol boat was wrecked at Normandy in a storm.
    USCGC CG-83477 [​IMG] United States Navy The 83-foot patrol boat was wrecked at Normandy in a storm.

    TWO BOATS OF RESCUE FLOTILLA LOST IN STORM
    On June 21, 1944, a very bad storm hit the coast of France, just two weeks after D-day and two of the 83 foot Coast Guard boats of the Rescue Flotilla were lost. There had been 60 of these boats, 30 assigned to the American and 30 to the British sector of the Normandy beachhead. At the time of the storm six of these craft were operating a cross channel dispatch service, making a total of four crossings a day carrying guard mail, urgent Army dispatches, etc. Originally the Army had used planes for this service but found that the 83 footers got the information across faster than the planes. The boats crossed in 6 hours. While the crossing by plane was much faster, the conditions in France were so chaotic that the delay in getting mail from the landing strip to its destination reduced the value of the plane service.

    When the storm broke many of the skippers of the 83 footers got underway and got out but some were trapped in near shore and the whole area was so filled up with underwater obstructions, unmarked wrecks, etc., that it was inevitable some of the small craft found it impossible to keep way on and the wind and sea were too much for their light ground tackle. Then to make matters worse, every type of craft from LST's on down dragged anchor and swept like an avalanche onto the beach, taking everything in their path along with them. One of the 83 footers had her whole bottom taken off by some submerged obstacle and sank in thirty feet of water. Another was crushed onto the beach with LST's and everything else, six deep on top of her and was a total wreck. A third had the same experience but her only damage was the loss of a large section of her keel and a hole 5' x 6' in her sides. This third boat was repaired and soon again placed in operation.

    Source: HyperWar: The Coast Guard at War--8: Lost Cutters

    Another Source that you may wish to look at (lots of photo’s and info)

    Rescue Flotilla 1 Photo Gallery
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2020
  17. Dave55

    Dave55 Atlanta, USA

    Welcome to the forum, Kathy.

    The picture in this link isn't about CG-13 but has a picture onboard a Coast Guard LCI at Normandy that I like. Maybe your dad experienced something pleasant like this, I hope.

    German boy on USCG LCI
     
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  18. KathyW

    KathyW New Member

    Thanks so much Temujin, for this information & sources. Truly appreciated!
     
  19. Temujin

    Temujin Member

    Recently I have been working with the family of a Former Officer of a Rescue Flotilla One cutter. They discovered documents “in the attic” from his service.

    They have found a list of ALL the Officer’s who served in Rescue Flotilla One.

    Below is the list that they found


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