Any photograph restorers out there?

Discussion in 'Photo Restoration' started by soren1941, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Lee, I'm curious what size in megabytes would an average 8 x 10 colour print be scanned at 1200 ppi and how much longer to scan that compared to one at 300 ppi. I think for most people here going with 300 ppi initially would be sufficient especially if you are doing a lot of old prints. Or at least I'm trying to convince myself of that as I just did a wack of old family snaps that way. I can't really see them being used commercially at any time.

    Chuck
     
  2. PsyWar.Org

    PsyWar.Org Archive monkey

    Chuck, few people would need to scan a colour 8 x 10 print at 1200ppi. I wasn't suggesting that. However, if you were scanning 8 x 10 line art, like a logo or solid colour poster, you might want to.

    The two important factors are:
    - the size of the original compared to the required output size (e.g. you need to enlarge the size);
    - the colour depth of the original, e.g. is it monochrome, greyscale or full colour.

    For a 1:1 reproduction of a full colour original then 300ppi is sufficient for most uses. (Assuming the full colour original is a print made from a 35mm colour film negative)

    Lee
     
  3. Cee

    Cee Senior Member Patron

    Lee, thanks for that. I hate to think I should have gone bigger, so that puts my mind at rest a little. On top of that I probably would need a better computer to deal with those enormous files that result from higher ppi's.

    Oh and I looked for your picture Ron, but couldn't find it.

    Chuck
     
  4. PsyWar.Org

    PsyWar.Org Archive monkey

    Chuck, as long as we're talking about 8 x 10 prints that originated from 35mm colour negative then 300ppi is fine.

    For a black and white 8 x 10 print from a 35mm negative, personally I would be looking to scan at 600ppi.

    But of course input resolution is just part of the equation as far as quality scanning is concerned ;-)

    Lee
     

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